17th FINA World Championships ALL SPORTS Breaking News Other Sports Top news

Lefevere: Viviani can win more than Kittel in 2018

Quick-Step Floors boss confident Gilbert can complete Monument victories.

Quick-Step Floors team manager Patrick Lefevere believes that with the full backing of his Belgian outfit new signing Elia Viviani can trump outgoing sprinter Marcel Kittel in the victory stakes next year. Kittel is set to join Katusha-Alpecin next season after two years with Lefevere’s team with Viviani coming in to replace the German in their line-up.
Related Articles

Kittel finished jointly top in the victory rankings with teammate Fernando Gaviria and Jakub Mareczko in 2017, with Viviani ending the year in 10th place.

“If my memory is okay, Kittel won 14 races and Viviani nine. So, when he joins our team then maybe it will be the opposite,” Lefevere told Cyclingnews at last week’s Rouleur Classic. “I don’t say that he didn’t have the help of his teammates at Sky, it would not be correct to say this, but it is different. If we are focused on him, I hope that we can kick his ass.”

With other big name riders moving to rival teams in 2018, Lefevere had hoped to keep Kittel on board. Explaining to German sponsor Lidl why Kittel would not be with the team next year was a difficult, but the 29-year-old did not want to compete with Fernando Gaviria. Both wanted to be designated sprinter at the 2018 Tour de France.

“If I’m honest, I wanted to keep him. You have to understand that Lidl is one of the biggest companies in the world and they’re German. He’s German and a very good looking guy, he speaks very well. That was very important,” explained Lefevere.

“My contract wasn’t signed with Lidl and he said that he would leave the team. That was a very tough moment for me, to explain to those people who aren’t specialist in cycling that their star rider leaves the team. He said that he didn’t want to compete with Gaviria. I don’t understand, but it is his choice.”

However things pan out with Viviani, Quick-Step Floors have retained the services of Gaviria until at least 2019 after agreeing a two-year extension to his contract at the start of August.

Speaking to Cyclingnews, Lefevere emphasised the importance of quality over quantity when it came to victories – less is more the Belgian manager said – and Gaviria delivered for Quick-Step Floors in 2017. In his second year as a professional, the Colombian took nine WorldTour wins including four at the Giro d’Italia and next year he will make his debut at the Tour de France.

There is little doubt that Gaviria has talent by the bucket load, but as he finishes his neo-pro years, it is about nurturing that talent and making sure his ego doesn’t get too big.

“He’s so talented that with not so much work he can win. He has to understand that it’s not always that easy,” Lefevere said.

“He’s so talented, I think that if he stays with his feet on the ground and he doesn’t start ‘flying’ then he can go a long way. He’s so impatient because he’s talented and he wants to have it all in one year.”

Lefevere says that an important part of keeping Gaviria grounded is ensuring he knows his place within the team and that talent needs to be supported by knowledge from the more experienced riders. This season has been a steep learning curve for Gaviria, but there is still more to do in the coming year.

“We have some key people on the team who are able to say yes you are very important but you are not the most important rider on the team,” said Lefevere.

“He should listen to Iljo Keisse if he says ‘You have to come to the front with me in Flanders or in Waregem, because on this corner it happens.’ This year, he has already learned 75 per cent and I hope that next year he will complete the other 25 per cent.”

Along with Gaviria and a whole host of other names, Philippe Gilbert also extended his contract with Quick-Step Floors for another two years. Gilbert came to the team on a one-year deal after a five-year stint at BMC that had yielded mixed results.

Lefevere was initially doubtful about signing a 34-year-old Gilbert who had, aside from the odd result, appeared to have lost his way. It was Gilbert’s desire to make history that convinced the hard to please team manager to take him on.

“In life, it isn’t all about condition, it is about motivation and focus. I believe in focusing,” explained Lefevere. “He called me, and I said Philippe don’t waste your time or my time, I can’t pay you. He said, within 30 seconds, it’s not about money. He said: ‘I have three gaps in my palmares, Flanders, Roubaix and San Remo and you’re the only team I can complete my palmares. It’s not about money’.

“I was even more surprised when riders like Stybar and others said that it was ‘really a bonus to the team because he is giving us advice and motivating us.’ I knew what Philippe was because I’ve known him since he was 15, but I didn’t know he was such a big motivator.”

Gilbert delivered on his promise in spades when he took a dramatic victory at the Tour of Flanders in April, attacking on the Oude Kwaremont and soloing to the line.

Two weeks later he beat Michal Kwiatkowski to take his fourth Amstel Gold victory. However a tear to his right kidney forced him to miss the rest of the Classics. With the Tour of Flanders in his back pocket, Gilbert needs to win Milan-San Remo and Paris-Roubaix to become only the fourth rider to complete the set of Classics victories.

Lefevere believes his rider can do it.

“Sure, I was very surprised about how motivated he was to win Flanders and he did it,” Lefevere told Cyclingnews. “Roubaix I’m doubting a little bit more but he’s from the Ardennes and they are strong.

“Why Philippe couldn’t do it next year at Roubaix? In Roubaix, you can really play with tactics. If you have a strong team then you can play chess and we are strong at chess. It’s very easy. Business and cycling is the same. You see that you don’t have to change your computer, they have to change you.”

17th FINA World Championships ALL SPORTS Breaking News Top news

At swimming worlds, Hungary deserves biggest gold of all

The World Championships came to a close earlier this month and it always takes a week or two to reflect back and absorb some of the great performances that we witnessed, along with the event’s overall impact on the sport and the global sporting landscape.

I have the unique perspective in that the last world championships I attended were the 1998 FINA World Championships in Perth, Australia. Yes, those were the last Swimming Worlds that did not have a swimmer named either Michael Phelps or Ryan Lochte competing in them — so my Worlds experiences have bookended the Michael Phelps era.

And my lasting impression is this: wow, have the World Championships grown up! The 1998 Worlds were a staid, low-key affair with a medium-sized outdoor venue, a food court that could reasonably be compared to the vendor area at a big high school football game and lukewarm buzz around town – even in swimming-crazed Australia. By contrast, the events in Budapest were a veritable Super Bowl of swimming over two weeks: five different venues, a massively popular (and crowded) fan zone, a state of the art indoor swimming and diving arena, light shows, musical acts and signs, banners and billboards visible all around the graceful Hungarian capital city on the Danube.

That’s not to take away from my first Worlds experience 20 years ago, they were wonderfully-organized. Instead, it highlights the growth of swimming over the past two decades thanks to increased television emphasis on our sport at the Olympics, the media coverage explosion from the Michael Phelps era, the addition of races like semifinal heats and 50m sprints, easier access to meets and athlete personalities via social media and livestreaming and the increased production values at big events beyond the Games such as Worlds, Olympic Trials and Euros.

As someone who has been closely following Olympic sports since the mid-90s, it’s fair to say that – in the U.S. at least – swimming has certainly overtaken Track & Field and Gymnastics as the number one summer Olympic sport if you go by year-round media coverage, personalities and television popularity.

But beyond the global growth of swimming, you still need local organizers and home town fans who understand how to put on a good show, support both home country athletes and international stars with boisterous energy and have a solid understanding of swimming’s unique characteristics as a sport. Budapest did all that — and more.

Hungary took over the hosting duties for these World Championships in February 2015, when Guadalajara, Mexico withdrew as host four years after they were first selected. With just over two years time, the city of Budapest put on quite a show that made our sport proud. It was called the biggest sporting event in Hungary’s history – and it showed.

Beyond the organizational aspects, Hungary’s great aquatics tradition – don’t forget their proud water polo history – left a big imprint on the Championships. They cheered their home country swimmers with adoring enthusiasm, whether it was Katinka Hosszú winning gold in the IM or their underdog men’s freestyle relay team coming from an outside lane to snag bronze. They cheered non-medal finishers and semifinal qualifiers alike while recognizing the talents and accomplishments of international stars like Sarah Sjostrom and Adam Peaty when world records were broken.

Caeleb Dressel and Sarah Sjostrom may have won FINA Swimmer of the Meet honors, but it was the public’s energy, enthusiasm and grand stage provided to these athletes that put such a terrific spotlight on their successes and made all the competitors shine bright. It left quite the impression. And for that, I would award Budapest the biggest gold of all.

Photo: MTI Rob Penner is the VP, Marketing & Communications at SwimOutlet.com, the official online retailer of USA Swimming. He has worked eight Olympic Games and has three Emmy Awards working as a writer for NBC Olympics.

Source: swimswam.com/Courtesy of Rob Penner

17th FINA World Championships ALL SPORTS Breaking News Swimming

The 17th FINA Masters World Championship has begun in Budapest

The 17th FINA Masters World Championship has begun in Budapest Yesterday, on the 7th of August 2017, the 17th FINA Masters World Championship kicked off at Budapest.

Following the biggest Aquatics World Championship ever, spectators and fans can root for our favourite Olympics, Europe- and World Champions. The Aquatics World Championship’s competition venues have been filled already at 8 o’clock yesterday with sportsmen and women and fans, as the 17th FINA Masters World Championship has begun – said Miklós Borsa, the spokesman of Bp2017 Nkft. The water polo games have started in Alfréd Hajós National Swimming Stadium, the synchronised swimming numbers’ venue is the Városliget, and the diving numbers are taking place at the Danube Arena.

There are four times more competitors taking part in the numbers and games than in the elite championship: almost 10,000 sportsmen registered from 92 countries. There are approximately 6500 masters swimmers, 540 synchronised swimmers, 1200 pelagian swimmers and 340 divers, and 120 water polo teams, which is the maximum number allowed of competing teams in this number.

The organisers are expecting a great number of spectators cheering at the venues, as there are no entrance fees to the games. For example, the tickets for the Millenium water polo team’s matches – some of which took place yesterday, and the rest taking place today – have run out just in a couple minutes already at the pre-registration. The reason for this is the great interest in the team which members are fan-favourite Olympic athletes.

Although the numbers have begun yesterday in the morning, the official opening ceremony of the masters championship took place only at 8:30 pm yesterday evening. The venue for the ceremony was the spectator zone at Margaret Island, the participation was free. The organisers have put up a special show to welcome the almost 10,000 competitors and fans. Among others, the ExperiDance group and the Budapest Gypsy Symphony Orchestra performed.

Further good news for those interested in Hungary’s and the FINA’s biggest sports event is that yesterday the Budapest 2017 Masters app was launched, which is the official mobile application of the 17th FINA Masters World Championship. You can stay updated on the games, as there are news, programmes, interviews, videos and photos about the event available on the app. It is compatible with Windows, Android and iOS operating systems.

The spectator zones await fans with interesting and colourful programs during the championship. For example, yesterday before the opening ceremony the Millenium team’s match was screened at the spectator zone at Margaret Island. The Millenium team played with the Turkish team, where the previous won.

(Posted by Zsóka Kovács)

17th FINA World Championships Breaking News Swimming Top news

Most memorable FINA World Championships come to an end in Budapest

The 17th edition of the FINA World Championships concludes today, July 31, in Budapest (HUN), which has played host to the biggest sporting event ever hosted in the country for the past 17 days.

FINA and the Budapest 2017 Organising Committee addressed the media representatives at the closing press conference, held at the Duna Arena, before the final swimming session of the week.

“Our National Federations, our athletes, coaches and officials, lived an intense experience during these two weeks. They found outstanding venues in superb locations; they were supported by immense crowds; they produced wonderful performances; and they could enjoy the hospitality and kindness of the Magyar people.”, said the newly re-elected FINA President Dr Julio C. Maglione.

“Everything was perfect and we all felt at home here in Hungary!”, he continued.

“I am sure that these impressions will be followed by amazing figures in terms of worldwide TV viewership and digital exposure of these Championships. The 17th FINA World Championships definitively improved the strength of Aquatics in the five continents and confirmed this event as one of the most prestigious and successful ones in the world of Sport.”

After thanking the different stakeholders and the Hungarian authorities, the President let FINA Executive Director Cornel Marculescu express his gratitude and positive vision of the two-week Aquatic festival.

“These were fantastic Championships. Everybody is happy. We are here to serve the athletes and the work of the Organising Committee has been fantastic. “, emphasised Marculescu .

“Balatonfured was a fantastic venue. The set up was great. I like to compare it to the sea of Hungary. The castle at the back of the synchronised swimming venue, in Varosliget Park, pleased all the broadcasters that were able to catch incredible images of the competition. And finally, the water polo venue, already well-know, didn’t disappoint.”

Tamas Gyarfas, FINA Executive Member and Co-Chairman of the Organising Committee added a short but sincere comment: “It was a great honour for me to take part in this event, thank you all.”

“The last 17 days were a true celebration of Aquatic sports and paid respect to what we have been able to achieve together with FINA. Working hand in hand with FINA was key in the success of this event and the tree planted by Mr Marculescu is a symbol of this collaboration”, concluded Budapest 2017 Organising Committee Chairman Miklós Seszták.

“I sincerely thank the effort of FINA and the Organising Committee but also the volunteers, whose help has been greatly appreciated.”

17th FINA World Championships Breaking News Swimming Top news

FINA Aquatics, 17th day – Katinka Hosszú wins gold medal, Dávid Verrasztó takes silver medal for Hungary

FINA Aquatics, 17th day – Katinka Hosszú wins gold medal, Dávid Verrasztó takes silver medal for Hungary Katinka Hosszú of Hungary won the women’s 400 m medley event in the 17th World Aquatics Championships in Budapest on Sunday, the closing day of the competition. Chase Kalisz of the United States won the men’s 400 m medley event, Dávid Verrasztó took silver medal. The United States won the men’s 4×100 m medley relay event and the women’s 4×100 m medley relay event with a world record of 3:51.55 minutes. Gregorio Paltrinieri of Italy won the men’s 1,500 m freestyle event. Camille Lacourt of France won the men’s 50 m backstroke event in the 17th World Aquatics Championships in Budapest. Sarah Sjöström of Sweden won the women’s 50 m freestyle event. Steve Lo Bue of the United States won the men’s 27 metre high diving event of the 17th World Aquatics Championships at the Battyhány Square in Budapest. Lilly King of the United States won the women’s 50 m breaststroke event with a world record of 29.40 seconds.

Hosszú wins women’s 400 m medley
Results:
1. Katinka Hosszú (HUN) 4:29.33 min
2. Mireia Belmonte (ESP) 4:32.17
3. Sydney Pickrem (CAN) 4:32.88

Kalisz wins men’s 400 m medley
Results:
1. Chase Kalisz (USA) 4:05.90 min
2. Dávid Verrasztó (HUN) 4:08.38
3. Daiya Seto (JPN) 4:09.14

United States wins men’s 4×100 m medley relay
Results:
1. United States 3:27.91 min
2. Britain 3:28.95
3. Russia 3:29.76

United States swimmers won women’s 4×100 m medley relay and men’s
Results:
1. United States 3:51.55 min
2. Russia 3:53.38
3. Australia 3:54.29
The US relay was composed of Kathleen Baker, Lilly King, Kelsi Worrell and Simone Manuel. Paltrinieri

wins men’s 1,500 m freestyle
Results:
1. Gregorio Paltrinieri (ITA) 14:35.85 min
2. Mykhailo Romanchuk (UKR) 14:37.14
3. Mack Horton (AUS) 14:47.70

Lacourt wins men’s 50 m backstroke
Results:
1. Camille Lacourt (FRA) 24.35 sec
2. Junya Koga (JPN) 24.51
3. Matt Grevers (USA) 24.56

Sjöström wins women’s 50 m freestyle
Results:
1. Sarah Sjöström (SWE) 23.69 sec
2. Ranomi Kromowidjojo (NED) 23.85
3. Simone Manuel (USA) 23.97

Lo Bue wins men’s 27 m high diving
Results:
1. Steve Lo Bue (USA) 397.15 points
2. Michal Navratil (CZE) 390.90
3. Alessandro de Rose (ITA) 379.65 Michal Navratil (CZE), Steve Lo Bue (USA) and Alessandro De Rose (ITA),

King wins women’s 50 m breaststroke with world record
Results:
1. Lilly King (USA) 29.40 sec
2. Yuliya Efimova (RUS) 29.57
3. Katie Meili (USA) 29.99

17th FINA World Championships Breaking News Top news

Katinka Hosszu Wins Third Straight 400 IM World Title, Fourth Overall

Katinka Hosszu won her fourth medal of the week as she won her third straight 400 IM World Title on Sunday night in Budapest at the FINA World Championships. Hosszu broke her championship record with a 4:29.33 to break the record she held from Rome in 2009 at 4:30.31. This is Hosszu’s fourth overall World Title in this event.

Spain’s Mireia Belmonte (4:32.17) collected silver and Canada’s Sydney Pickrem (4:32.88) collected bronze after a disaster 200 IM final. Belmonte won her third medal of the meet.

Japan’s Yui Ohashi (4:34.50), Japan’s Sakiko Shimizu (4:35.62), USA’s Leah Smith (4:36.09), USA’s Elizabeth Beisel (4:37.63) and Great Britain’s Hannah Miley (4:38.34) also competed in the championship final.

Hosszu joins Sarah Sjostrom as the only female swimmers to win the same event at World Championships four times as Sjostrom won the 100 fly in 2009, 2013, 2015 and 2017. Hosszu had the exact same streak as she failed to medal in 2011.

17th FINA World Championships Breaking News Top news

Croatia spoils Hungary’s night with second crown

Budapest, Hungary, July 29.— Croatia denied Hungary a fairytale ending to the FINA World Championships men’s water polo competition, winning 8-6 and adding to its only other title, attained in Melbourne, Australia, 10 years ago.

Croatia won the opening period 4-0, Hungary levelled at 4-4; Croatia went 7-4 up early in the fourth and carried the advantage to the end at the Alfred Hajos Pool here tonight. Captain Sandro Sukno scored twice in the last eight minutes and Championship Most Valuable Player Marton Vamos netted three for Hungary.

It was probably fair that Croatia should win, having sent multi-titled Serbia packing in a heart-stopping and energy-sapping semifinal on Thursday night.

Hungarian goalkeeper was heroic throughout the two weeks and deservedly was named the tournament’s best goalkeeper.

Hungary was denied its fourth World Championship title from 10 finals and now has a record 11 medals overall — three golds, seven silvers and one bronze.

Croatia lost to Serbia in both Rio 2016 and Kazan 2015 so it was due for a win. Its record at World Championships now reads two golds, one silver and three bronzes.

In the bronze-medal match, outgoing world champion Serbia made sure of bronze against Greece with an 11-8 decision. Serbia had nine players make the scoresheet. Greek captain Ioannis Fountoulis scored three goals and finished the tournament as the top goal-scorer with 23, streeting of his rivals.

Montenegro took out fifth position, beating Italy 5-4 in a low-scoring and mistake-ridden match. Drasko Brguljan sent in three goals for the victor.

In the classification 7-8 match, Australia defeated Russia 10-7 with Australia using eight scorers and Russia’s best was Dmitri Kholod with three goals.

Media All Star Team: Goalkeeper: Viktor Nagy (HUN). Centre forward Luka Loncar (CRO). Field players: Francesco di Fulvio (ITA), Ioannis Fountoulis (GRE), Andrija Prlainovic (SRB), Sandro Sukno (CRO), Marton Vamos (HUN).

Most Valuable Player: Marton Vamos (HUN).

Best Goalkeeper: Viktor Nagy (HUN).

Results:

Match 45, 12:00, RUSSIA 7 AUSTRALIA 10
Classification 7-8

Match 46. 13:30, MONTENEGRO 5 ITALY 4
Classification 5-6

Match 47. 15:00, GREECE 8 SERBIA 11
Classification 3-4

Match 48, 20:30, HUNGARY 6 CROATIA 8
Classification 1-2
(Russell McKinnon, FINA Media Committee)

17th FINA World Championships Breaking News Swimming Top news

Swimming Day 7

Another memorable evening at the Duna Arena, during the seventh day of the swimming finals at the FINA World Championships in Budapest (HUN)!

And one protagonist, who made history: for the first time in a single session, a swimmer wins three gold medals! His name: Caeleb Dressel, from the USA. The 20-year-old North American easily won the 50m free, 100m butterfly, and led-off with success the US quartet in the mixed 4x100m free relay. Retain his name: Dressel will certainly be one of the stars to look in the future and the Tokyo 2020 Games seem to be the ideal moment to shine at Olympic level.

The fourth gold of the day for the USA came from Katie Ledecky, also easily triumphing in the women’s 800m free. The US great has now 14 gold medals at FINA World Championships (including five in Hungary).

The two non-American wins of the day were obtained by Sarah Sjostrom in the 50m butterfly, in a new Championships Record. Later in the evening, the Swedish champion established a new World Record in the semis of the 50m free, clocking 23.67.

Finally, Emily Seebohm (AUS) earned gold in the women’s 200m back, leaving Katinka Hosszu (HUN) with the silver, and the Hungarian crowd with a feeling of frustration…

Women’s 50m fly

In the first final of the day, Sarah Sjostrom (SWE) was clearly superior in the women’s 50m butterfly, getting the gold in a new Championships record of 24.60. The previous best mark of the competition had also been achieved by the Swedish great, two years ago in Kazan, in a time of 24.96. After Inge de Bruijn (NED) in 2001/2003, Sjostrom is the second swimmer to revalidate the title in this event. She is also the current WR holder, with a 24.43 effort from July 2014 in her country. Silver medallist in the 100m free and winner of the 100m fly in Budapest, Sjostrom was the only one in the field to swim under 25 seconds, with Ranomi Kromowidjojo, from the Netherlands, getting silver in 25.38 and Farida Osman, from Egypt, earning bronze in 25.39. It was the first medal-ever for the African country in the history of the World Championships (all disciplines and genders included). Osman had been fifth in Kazan 2015, while Kromowidjojo was bronze medallist four years ago in Barcelona.

Sjöström Sarah (SWE), gold WR

“I was very disappointed with my 100m free yesterday but I knew I had two more events to go. I felt really strong and I was looking forward to doing the 50s.”

“I know that I swim really well when I have a warm up race before. I got a really good start and I could feel I was swimming fast. It felt really good. I was just trying to make up for yesterday. I was keeping in mind the WR I did the first night in the relay.”

“I think I am one of the girls who took a big step in the 100m free this year. I spent more time practicing my technique.”

“I am very happy to hold the record in the 50 and all the rest of the four fastest events. I am the fastest swimmer in the world and I am very happy. Everyone thought that these records wouldn’t break after they remove the swimsuits but I did it!”

“I will still go with the same events for a few more years. I am only 24 years old!”

“The Americans (Katie and Caleb) are very impressive. I also watch Katie, even if I focus on my races. She is one-of-a-kind and Dressel took a really big step this year. It is cool to see.”

Men’s 50m free

Caeleb Dressel, from the United States, continues to reinforce his revelation status in Budapest, by getting the gold in the men’s 50m free, in a fast time of 21.15. Already the fastest of the semis, the 20-year-old North American swimmer accumulates now four titles in the Magyar capital: besides the 50m free, he was also champion in the 100m free, 4x100m free and 4x100m medley relay. He became the fourth swimmer in history to accumulate the 50m and 100m crowns in the same edition of the Championships, after Alexander Popov (RUS, 1994 and 2003), Anthony Ervin (USA, 2001) and Cesar Cielo (BRA, 2009). Bruno Fratus (third in Kazan 2015) gave Brazil the fifth medal in the swimming competition, touching for silver in 21.27. The bronze went to Ben Proud, of Great Britain, in 21.43, while 2013 silver medallist Vladimir Morozov (RUS) was this time fourth in 21.46. The World Record (20.91) holder Cielo, the second Brazilian of the final, had to content with the eighth and last position, in 21.83.

Women’s 200m back

With Katinka Hosszu (HUN) swimming in lane 1, the Duna Arena almost came down to support her, but the crowd’s help was not enough to make the Magyar star swim faster. In the end, Emily Seebohm, from Australia, revalidated her 2015 world title in 2:05.68, with Hosszu (runner-up at the Rio 2016 Olympics and bronze medallist two years ago in Russia) getting the silver in 2:05.85. It’s the 12th world medal for the Magyar great, who now accumulates six gold, one silver and five bronze. In third, Kathleen Baker (USA, 2:06.48) completed the podium. The North American was silver in the 100m back here in Budapest, after being also second at the Rio Games. Baker’s achievement also represents the eighth consecutive medal for US in this event, since 2003.

Seebohm Emily (AUS), gold

“It was really hard for me after Rio. A lot was going on in my body. I took a little bit of a break. And now I am very amazed to see what I have been able to achieve. To get over Rio took me a while but I knew my feelings came from my illness not because I didn’t what to swim. The support I had around me – Mitch, my parents, my friends and Mitch’s parents –no one put pressure on me but supported me so much. They were telling me to do what makes me happy.”

“When I was coming home after training session I had to lay down all day in my bed and couldn’t move until the next session. And I think that’s why I was unhappy because I couldn’t (horse) ride and do the other stuff that make me happy.”

“What I did last year helped a lot with my preparation. I was feeling better in my body and inside my head. I am so proud of what I have overcome (her illness). I was here to swim my best and it’s just has good as getting a gold medal. Saying that it is so amazing to get a gold medal. We just need to do our best, that’s the Australian way I guess.”

“Hearing the crowd pushed me today because I understood Hosszu was close to me. It helped me to give more than I thought I had left.”

“Our physio and team here is amazing. I don’t think I could have done what I did today without them. You know I get treatment twice a day…”

“I am taking each year that comes and I am really excited about the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games. I don’t know what will come in three year’s time but I hope my body can hold until Tokyo 2020 to make my fourth Olympics. You will see me at the Swimming World Cup too.”

Men’s 100m fly

Caeleb Dressel (USA) continued to make history at the FINA World Championships, with another impressive victory in the 100m fly. He becomes the only swimmer in history to have won this event and the 100m free final in the same edition of the Championships. Touching gold in 49.86, he was 0.04 slower than the impressive World Record from Michael Phelps, established in Rome 2009. Dressel clearly dominated operations in the pool, with silver medallist (surprising Kristof Milak, from Hungary), arriving almost one second later, in 50.62. Joseph Schooling (SGP), who had won in an outstanding way this event in Rio 2016, leaving Phelps, Le Clos (eliminated in the semis in Budapest) and Laszlo Cseh (fifth of the final) with a shared silver medal, was this time the one dividing his bronze medal, with James Guy, from Great Britain. Both athletes touched in 50.83. Dressel, turning 21 on August 16, will definitively be the athlete to watch in the future and his performances in the Magyar capital are a good anticipation of what he can do at the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games. In Rio, last summer, he won two gold, but in relay events, the 4x100m free and 4x100m medley.

Women’s 800m free

Katie Ledecky (USA), once more, swam a solitary race, to get her 14th gold at the FINA World Championships, this time in the 800m free. The North American great touched for victory in 8:12.68, approximately eight seconds slower than her World Record of 8:04.79, set at the Rio 2016 Olympics. In the Magyar capital, this is the fifth triumph for Ledecky, after previous successes in the 400m and 1500m free, 4x100m free and 4x200m free relay. She was also silver medallist in the 200m free, behind Federica Pellegrini (ITA). Moreover, this is the third consecutive world crown for the North American in this event, after the 2013 and 2015 titles. With the gold settled, the minor medals went to Li Bingjie (CHN), in 8:15.46 – her first individual podium presence at this level, after being second in the 4x200m free relay -, and to Leah Smith, also from the United States in 8:17.22. Smith had been third in the 400m free at the 2016 Rio Olympics. Mireia Belmonte (ESP), the world champion in the 200m fly in Budapest, had to content with the fourth place in 8:23.30.

LEDECKY Katie (USA), gold

“My goal is to go out there and win the gold for USA.”

“I am happy with my gold medals but there is always room for improvement. My time wasn’t as fast as I have been in the past. You take it and it was the end of a long week with lots of ups and downs.”

“It’s pretty tiring to swim so many events in a week but I am happy how I bounce back from a race to another and I was happy with how it all went.” “I am sure that the schedule will look different at the Olympics. There are so many factor to swim such a big programme like this week.”

“I don’t train massively differently for the different distance. I just to work on my body and some days are shorter than others and sometimes I feel like swimming faster. It is not easy.”

“I stay motivated by the people I prepare with, my family, my friends, my teammates, my coach. I am now competition for my college to. I am always working something towards something. Now that I have one year in Standford I can see the experience I have gained. I can set some heavy goals for the future.”

“I am trying to take care of business outside the pool too. I keep communicate with my professor, I do my homework. We all challenge each other and we’re all in the same boat. It is a very inspiring environment to be in at Standford. It is important to manage your time the best you can and form strong relationships with your professor and your teammates, classmates. Not be afraid to ask for help.”

“I am not going to venture in open water!”

Mixed 4x100m free relay

And the third gold medal of the day for Caeleb Dressel – an unprecedented feat in the history of the World Championships – came in the mixed 4x100m free relay, where the North American led-off the quartet for a final winning time of 3:19.60, the second World Record of the day. The previous global mark had been achieved in Kazan 2015, also by the USA in 3:23.05. Dressel swam the first 100m in an excellent time of 47.22, and then was followed by Nathan Adrian, Mallory Commerford and Simone Manuel. The US team did all the race in the lead, winning the fourth gold of the day out of the six finals contested at the Duna Arena. The Netherlands had to settle for silver in 3:21.81 (also under the former WR), while Canada got the bronze in 3:23.55.

In semi-final action, it will be a thrilling final in the women’s 50m breaststroke, with the medals to be contested, most probably, by this quartet: Lilly King (USA, 29.60), Yulia Efimova (RUS, 29.73), Katie Meili (USA, 30.12), and Ruta Meilutyte (LTU, 30.40). In the women’s 50m free, the discussion for the gold seems to be simple, with Sarah Sjostrom establishing a new World Record of 23.67, and improving the 8-year-old mark of Britta Steffen (GER), who had clocked 23.73 in Rome 2009. Finally, in the men’s 50m back, Camille Lacourt (FRA) has so far the advantage, qualifying first for the decisive race in 24.30. He is followed by Junya Koga (JPN, 24.44) and Matt Grevers (USA, 24.65).

(Pedro Adrega & Camille Chappelet, FINA Communications Department)

17th FINA World Championships Breaking News Swimming

Swimming Day 7 – Sjostrom and Dressel continue to impress

Women’s 50m fly

In the first final of the day, Sarah Sjostrom (SWE) was clearly superior in the women’s 50m butterfly, getting the gold in a new Championships record of 24.60. The previous best mark of the competition had also been achieved by the Swedish great, two years ago in Kazan, in a time of 24.96. After Inge de Bruijn (NED) in 2001/2003, Sjostrom is the second swimmer to revalidate the title in this event. She is also the current WR holder, with a 24.43 effort from July 2014 in her country. Silver medallist in the 100m free and winner of the 100m fly in Budapest, Sjostrom was the only one in the field to swim under 25 seconds, with Ranomi Kromowidjojo, from the Netherlands, getting silver in 25.38 and Farida Osman, from Egypt, earning bronze in 25.39. It was the first medal-ever for the African country in the history of the World Championships (all disciplines and genders included). Osman had been fifth in Kazan 2015, while Kromowidjojo was bronze medallist four years ago in Barcelona.

Men’s 50m free

Caeleb Dressel, from the United States, continues to reinforce his revelation status in Budapest, by getting the gold in the men’s 50m free, in a fast time of 21.15. Already the fastest of the semis, the 20-year-old North American swimmer accumulates now four titles in the Magyar capital: besides the 50m free, he was also champion in the 100m free, 4x100m free and 4x100m medley relay. He became the fourth swimmer in history to accumulate the 50m and 100m crowns in the same edition of the Championships, after Alexander Popov (RUS, 1994 and 2003), Anthony Ervin (USA, 2001) and Cesar Cielo (BRA, 2009). Bruno Fratus (third in Kazan 2015) gave Brazil the fifth medal in the swimming competition, touching for silver in 21.27. The bronze went to Ben Proud, of Great Britain, in 21.43, while 2013 silver medallist Vladimir Morozov (RUS) was this time fourth in 21.46. The World Record (20.91) holder Cielo, the second Brazilian of the final, had to content with the eighth and last position, in 21.83.

(Pedro Adrega & Camille Chappelet, FINA Communications Department)

17th FINA World Championships Breaking News Swimming Top news

High Diving Day 2: Iffland wins first title for Australia

 

After two consecutive wins from US athletes, Rhiannan Iffland, from Australia, became the 2017 high diving world champion, following a spectacular performance today in Budapest (HUN).

Second after the first round on Friday, the Australian diver was rewarded for her consistency throughout the three last rounds of dives. Totalling 320.70 points – she never had scores under 8.0 today -, she was better than Adriana Jimenez (MEX), silver medallist in 308.90, and Yana Nestsiarava (BLR), third in 303.95. These three athletes were the only ones accumulating more than 300 points after the four combined dives.

Iffland, 25 years old, had already medalled in a recent FINA competition, the 2017 High Diving World Cup in Abu Dhabi (UAE), where she was second, precisely behind Jimenez. Her last dive in Budapest, a back 3 somersaults, 1 twist on the pike position was well noted by the judges and allowed the Australian to keep the lead, after a successful combination in the third round. Mexico’s Jimenez performed the best dive of the session, a flawless back, 3 somersaults in the pike position (DD 4.0, the highest from the medallists’ group), earning 110.00 points, but that wasn’t enough to catch Iffland for the gold. As with the Australian, Jimenez first award in a FINA event had also been the World Cup, earlier this year.

For Yana Nestsiarava, from Belarus, this wasn’t a novelty. Already third two years ago in Kazan, the 24-year-old has also earned bronze in the 2015 and 2017 editions of the World Cup, respectively in Cozumel (MEX) and Abu Dhabi (UAE).

The competition in Budapest had two notable absences, Lysanne Richard (CAN), winner of the 2016 World Cup, and Rachelle Simpson (USA), 2015 world champion and also gold medallist of the 2014 and 2015 World Cup. While the Canadian great had a last-minute injury, the North American star had professional obligations that could not make possible the trip to Hungary.

In terms of medallists at past FINA events, Ginger Huber (USA) was only ninth this time, while Cesilie Carlton (USA), the first world champion in 2013, concluded in sixth. Anna Bader, from Germany, provisional leader after Round 1 could not maintain the rhythm and was fifth. Helena Merten, from Australia, second at the 2016 World Cup was seventh in Budapest.

QUOTES

Rhiannan Iffland (AUS), gold

“It was definitively an amazing couple of days! The venue is great, and the view from the top of the platform is outstanding. We have the best view of all aquatic sports! In high diving, we are a very tight community, the same group travels around the world for six months, and we are always together. It’s nice to have someone around in such a dangerous and extreme sport”.

“It’s always the same feeling up there: we are always afraid. We are never 100% comfortable there; that is why we need a lot of mental strength to overcome that feeling. The only way to work that is by training a lot and say to yourself that you have done those movements and those dives a lot of times before. If you think, 20m is the double of 10m, so as we normally train in 10m, we have to work the dive into parts and then put it together when we are in a high diving competition”.

“People in Australia are now more aware for this sport. Media coverage is getting more intense and we hope that additional facilities will be available for diving. All this makes more people to come to the sport and will definitively help in raising our level”.

“The first person I contact when I have finished? Definitively my sister, as my biggest fan is my seven-year-old nephew!”

Adriana Jimenez (MEX), silver

“Everyone works so hard, we are a big family! And I feel so proud to belong to this family. Doing such a dangerous activity requires being surrounded by people with good energy and harmony around us. We know that there is always someone there, ready to help and comfort us”.

“I was a former 10m platform diver, who used to cry every time I was on the edge of the board. It may seem incredible but now I am performing from twice higher. The fear is always present, but you need to hold it and concentrate on your dive. How I do it? I don’t think too much on it, I deeply breath and I dive. I also do some relaxation and meditation exercises, so that I can keep my nerves away. I work with a psychologist in Mexico and this is positive to help us putting ourselves together”.

Jacqueline Valente (BRA), eighth

“It was my first time in Budapest and I got in love with this city. The scenario was magnificent and the venue really unforgettable. I had some problems with my armstand, but I managed to remain focused for my fourth attempt, which was quite good. It was the most difficult combination of this final, a DD 4.3, a new dive for me, and I was quite happy the way I performed. This proves that mentally I am quite strong… For the remaining of the season, I am competing in the Red Bull circuit and quite happy with my performances. You can see that DD is raising among women, which proves the evolution of the sport”.

Ginger Huber (USA), ninth

“It was a really exciting competition, held in a very nice city. It was my first time in Budapest and I liked it a lot. The only problem was the venue dressing, too much blueish. This is a difficulty for the divers, as we have to differentiate the water and the sky. For me personally, it was quite challenging and I had to work a lot mentally to get myself safe. As for the level of competition, it was amazing – the girls are progressing a lot. Myself and my next objectives? One dive and one competition at the time (Huber will complete 43 years old in December)”.
(Photo by Giorgio Scala/Deepbluemedia)
(Pedro Adrega, FINA Communications Department)