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10 YEARS OF KITCHEN SHOW YOUR DREAM KITCHEN IS NOT A DREAM ANYMORE.

The kitchen is the heart of our home, bearing a special significance in family life, whether it’s a regular week or the holiday season.

To celebrate kitchens, each year we invite the world’s top brands to present their unrivalled kitchen designs, state-of-the-art kitchen appliances and fantastic kitchen equipment to amaze visitors of the Kitchen Show.

At the Kitchen Show you will find amazing innovations, exciting appliances and kitchenware, marvellous furniture designs and a number of unforgettable cooking experiences. Whether you’re planning refurbishment or construction works, you’re a food lover, you love to spend quality time in your kitchen, or you’re simply interested to see the latest trends in kitchen design, Kitchen Show is the place for you. Make your perfect kitchen happen!

What makes a perfect kitchen?
The definition of perfect is a matter of taste. But designing and creating your own kitchen, one of the most important parts of your home, should be done with care and a refined taste. Don’t hesitate to visit Kitchen Show, the only kitchen-themed expo in Hungary, celebrating 10 years of providing endless inspiration and advice for kitchen lovers.

The Kitchen Show is Hungary’s only kitchen-themed event aimed at end consumers who are looking to create their perfect kitchens. Here at the Show you will find the leading brands in kitchen design, the latest trends and a wide variety of products to inspire you, and all-day advice services from professionals who can help you realize the kitchen you were dreaming of. Fall in love with your next kitchen at Budapest Arena on March 1-3, 2019.

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New Year’s Day 2019

New Year’s Day, also called simply New Year’s or New Year, is observed on January 1, the first day of the year on the modern Gregorian calendar as well as the Julian calendar.

In pre-Christian Rome under the Julian calendar, the day was dedicated to Janus, god of gateways and beginnings, for whom January is also named. As a date in the Gregorian calendar of Christendom, New Year’s Day liturgically marked the Feast of the Naming and Circumcision of Jesus, which is still observed as such in the Anglican Church and Lutheran Church.[2][3]

In present day, with most countries now using the Gregorian calendar as their de facto calendar, New Year’s Day is probably the most celebrated public holiday, often observed with fireworks at the stroke of midnight as the new year starts in each time zone. Other global New Year’s Day traditions include making New Year’s resolutions and calling one’s friends and family.[1]

History

In Christendom, under which the Gregorian Calendar developed, New Year’s Day traditionally marks the Feast of the Circumcision of Christ, which is still observed as such by the Anglican Church and the Lutheran Church.

Mesopotamia (Iraq) instituted the concept of celebrating the new year in 2000 BC and celebrated new year around the time of the vernal equinox, in mid-March.[4][5] The early Roman calendar designated March 1 as the new year. The calendar had just ten months, beginning with March. That the new year once began with the month of March is still reflected in some of the names of the months. September through December, our ninth through twelfth months, were originally positioned as the seventh through tenth months. (Septem is Latin for “seven”; octo, “eight”; novem, “nine”; and decem, “ten”.) Roman legend usually credited their second king Numa with the establishment of the months of January and February. These were first placed at the end of the year, but at some point came to be considered the first two months instead.[6]

The January Kalends (LatinKalendae Ianuariae) came to be celebrated as the new year at some point after it became the day for the inaugurating new consuls in 153 BC. Romans had long dated their years by these consulships, rather than sequentially, and making the kalends of January start the new year aligned this dating. Still, private and religious celebrations around the March new year continued for some time and there is no consensus on the question of the timing for January 1’s new status.[7] Once it became the new year, however, it became a time for family gatherings and celebrations. A series of disasters, notably including the failed rebellion of M. Aemilius Lepidus in 78 bc, established a superstition against allowing Rome’s market days to fall on the kalends of January and the pontiffs employed intercalation to avoid its occurrence.[8][9]

In AD 567, the Council of Tours formally abolished January 1 as the beginning of the year.[citation needed] At various times and in various places throughout medieval Christian Europe, the new year was celebrated on December 25 in honor of the birth of JesusMarch 1 in the old Roman style; March 25 in honor of Lady Day and the Feast of the Annunciation; and on the movable feast of Easter. These days were also astronomically and astrologically significant since, at the time of the Julian reform, March 25 had been understood as the spring equinox and December 25 as the winter solstice. (The Julian calendar’s small disagreement with the solar year, however, shifted these days earlier before the Council of Nicaea which formed the basis of the calculations used during the Gregorian reform of the calendar.[citation needed]) Medieval calendars nonetheless often continued to display the months running from January to December, despite their readers reckoning the transition from one year to the next on a different day.[citation needed]

Among the 7th century pagans of Flanders and the Netherlands, it was the custom to exchange gifts on the first day of the new year. This custom was deplored by Saint Eligius (died 659 or 660), who warned the Flemish and Dutch: “(Do not) make vetulas, [little figures of the Old Woman], little deer or iotticos or set tables [for the house-elf, compare Puck] at night or exchange New Year gifts or supply superfluous drinks [another Yule custom].”[10] However, on the date that European Christians celebrated the New Year, they exchanged Christmas presents because New Year’s Day fell within the twelve days of the Christmas season in the Western Christian liturgical calendar;[11] the custom of exchanging Christmas gifts in a Christian context is traced back to the Biblical Magi who gave gifts to the Child Jesus.[12][13]

Because of the leap year error in the Julian calendar, the date of Easter had drifted backward since the First Council of Nicaea decided the computation of the date of Easter in 325. By the sixteenth century, the drift from the observed equinox had become unacceptable. In 1582, Pope Gregory XIII declared the Gregorian calendar widely used today, correcting the error by a deletion of 10 days. The Gregorian calendar reform also (in effect) restored January 1 as New Year’s Day. Although most Catholic countries adopted the Gregorian calendar almost immediately, it was only gradually adopted among Protestant countries. The British, for example, did not adopt the reformed calendar until 1752. Until then, the British Empire  – and its American colonies  – still celebrated the new year on 25 March.

Most nations of Western Europe officially adopted 1 January as New Year’s Day somewhat before they adopted the Gregorian Calendar. In Tudor England, New Year’s Day, along with Christmas Day and Twelfth Night, was celebrated as one of three main festivities among the twelve days of Christmastide.[14] There, until the adoption of the Gregorian Calendar in 1752, the first day of the new year was the Western Christian Feast of the Annunciation, on 25 March, also called “Lady Day“. Dates predicated on the year beginning on 25 March became known as Annunciation Style dates, while dates of the Gregorian Calendar commencing on 1 January were distinguished as Circumcision Style dates,[15] because this was the date of the Feast of the Circumcision, the observed memorial of the eighth day of Jesus Christ‘s life after his birth, counted from the latter’s observation on Christmas, 25 December. Pope Gregoryacknowledged 1 January as the beginning of the new year according to his reform of the Catholic Liturgical Calendar.[16]

New Year’s Days in other calendars

In cultures which traditionally or currently use calendars other than the Gregorian, New Year’s Day is often also an important celebration. Some countries concurrently use the Gregorian and another calendar. New Year’s Day in the alternative calendar attracts alternative celebrations of that new year:

African

SEP
11
37 Tue Egypt
Ethiopia
  • Nayrouz and Enkutatash are the New Year’s Days of the Coptic Egyptians and the Ethiopians, respectively. Between ad 1900 and 2100, both occur on September 11 in most years and on September 12 in the years before Gregorian leap years. They preserve the legacy of the ancient Egyptian new year Wepet Renpet, which originally marked the onset of the Nileflood but which wandered through the seasons until the introduction of leap years to the traditional calendar by Augustus in the 20s bc.[17] In Ethiopia, the new year is held to mark the end of the summer rainy season.
JUN
10
23 Sun Philadelphia

East Asian

JAN
28
04 Sat ChinaVietnamSouth Korea
  • Chinese New Year is celebrated in many countries around the world. It is the first day of the lunar calendar and is corrected for the solar every three years. The holiday normally falls between January 20 and February 20.[19] The holiday is celebrated with food, families, lucky money (usually in a red envelope), and many other red things for good luck. Lion and dragon dances, drums, fireworks, firecrackers, and other types of entertainment fill the streets on this day.
  • Vietnamese New Year (Tết Nguyên Đán or Tết), more commonly known by its shortened name Tết or “Vietnamese Lunar New Year”, is the most important and popular holiday and festival in Vietnam, the holiday normally falls between 20 January and 20 February. It is the Vietnamese New Year marking the arrival of spring based on the Chinese calendar, a lunisolar calendar. The name Tết Nguyên Đán is Sino-Vietnamese for Feast of the First Morning, derived from the Hán nôm characters 節 元 旦.
JAN
1
01 Mon Japan
  • Japanese New Year is celebrated on January 1 because the Gregorian calendar is now used instead of the Chinese calendar.
  • Korean New Year, called Seollal (설날), is the first day of the lunar calendar.[20] Koreans also celebrate solar New Year’s Day on January 1 each year, following the Gregorian Calendar. New Year’s Day is a national holiday, so people get the day off while they have a minimum of three days off on Lunar New Year. Koreans celebrate New Year’s Day by preparing food for their ancestors’ spirits, visiting ancestors’ graves, and playing Korean games such as Yunnori (윷놀이) with families. Young children give respect to their parents, grandparents, relatives, and other elders by bowing down in a traditional way and are given good wishes and some money by the elders. Families enjoy the New Year also by counting down until 12:00 am on New Year’s Eve.

Southeast Asian

APR
13
15 Fri CambodiaThailandSri LankaLaos
  • Cambodian New Year (Chaul Chnam Thmey) is celebrated on April 13 or April 14. There are three days for the Khmer New Year: the first day is called “Moha Songkran”, the second is called “Virak Wanabat” and the final day is called “Virak Loeurng Sak”. During these periods, Cambodians often go to pagoda or play traditional games. Phnom Penh is usually quiet during Khmer New Year as most of the Cambodians prefer spending it at their respective hometowns.
  • Thai New Year is celebrated on April 13 or April 14 and is called Songkran in the local language. People usually come out to splash water on one another. The throwing of water originated as a blessing. By capturing the water after it had been poured over the Buddhas for cleansing, this “blessed” water is gently poured on the shoulder of elders and family for good fortune.

South Asian

APR
14
15 Sat IndiaBangladesh Nepal
  • Christians in India celebrate January 1 as the New Year according to the Gregorian calendarCatholic Christians also celebrate January 1 as The Solemnity of Mary, the Mother of God, the liturgical feast of the Blessed Virgin Mary.
  • Diwali related New Year’s celebrations include Marwari New Year and Gujrati New Year.
  • Indian New Year’s days has several variations depending on the region and is based on the Hindu calendar.
  • Hindu In Hinduism, different regional cultures celebrate new year at different times of the year. In Assam, Bengal, Kerala, Nepal, Odisha, Punjab,Telangana, Andrapradesh and Tamil Nadu households celebrate the new year when the Sun enters Aries on the Hindu calendar. This is normally on April 14 or April 15, depending on the leap year. Elsewhere in northern/central India, the Vikram Samvat calendar is followed. According to that the new year day is the first day of the Chaitra Month, also known as Chaitra Shukla Pratipada or Gudi Padwa. This basically is the first month of the Hindu calendar, the first shukla paksha (fortnight) and the first day. This normally comes around March 23–24, mostly around the Spring Equinox in Gregorian Calendar. The new year is celebrated by paying respect to elders in the family and by seeking their blessings. They also exchange tokens of good wishes for a healthy and prosperous year ahead.
  • Malayalam New Year (Puthuvarsham) is celebrated either on the first day of the month of Medam in mid-April which is known as Vishu or the first day of the month of Chingam, in the Malayalam Calendar in mid-August according to another reckoning. Unlike most other calendar systems in India, the New Year’s Day on the Malayalam Calendar is not based on any astronomical event. It is just the first day of the first of the twelve months on the Malayalam Calendar. The Malayalam Calendar (called Kollavarsham) originated in 825 CE, based on general agreement among scholars, with the re-opening of the city of Kollam (on Malabar Coast), which had been destroyed by a natural disaster.
  • Nepal Sambat is the Nepalese New Year celebration, which also coincides with the Diwali festival.
  • The Sikh New Year is celebrated as per the Nanakshahi calendar. The epoch of this calendar is the birth of the first Sikh GuruGuru Nanak in 1469. New Year’s Day falls annually on what is March 14 in the Gregorian Western calendar.[21]
  • Sinhalese New Year is celebrated in Sri Lankan culture predominantly by the Sri Lankan Sinhalese, while the Tamil New Year on the same day is celebrated by Sri Lankan Tamils. The Sinhalese New Year (aluth avurudda), marks the end of harvest season, by the month of Bak (April) between April 13 and April 14. There is an astrologically generated time gap between the passing year and the New Year, which is based on the passing of the sun from the Meena Rashiya (House of Pisces) to the Mesha Rashiya (House of Aries) in the celestial sphere. The astrological time difference between the New Year and the passing year (nonagathe) is celebrated with several Buddhist rituals and customs that are to be concentrated on, which are exclusive of all types of ‘work’. After Buddhist rituals and traditions are attended to, Sinhala and Tamil New Year-based social gatherings and festive parties with the aid of firecrackers, and fireworks would be organized. The exchange of gifts, cleanliness, the lighting of the oil lamp, making kiribath (Milk rice), and even the Asian Koel are significant aspects of the Sinhalese New Year.
  • Tamil New Year (Puthandu) is celebrated on April 13 or April 14. Traditionally, it is celebrated as Chiththirai Thirunaal in parts of Tamil Nadu to mark the event of the Sun entering Aries. Panchangam (almanac), is read in temples to mark the start of the Year.
  • Telugu New Year (Ugadi), Kannada New Year (Yugadi) is celebrated in March (generally), April (occasionally). Traditionally, it is celebrated as Chaitram Chaitra Shuddha Padyami in parts of Andhra Pradesh, Telangana and Karnataka to mark the event of New Year’s Day for the people of the Deccan region of India. It falls on a different day every year because the Hindu calendar is a lunisolar calendar. The Saka calendar begins with the month of Chaitra (March–April) and Ugadi/Yugadi marks the first day of the new year. Chaitra is the first month in Panchanga which is the Indian calendar. Panchangam (almanac), is read in temples to mark the start of the Year.

European

JAN
13
02 Sat Pembrokeshire
  • The Old New Year in Serbia is commonly called the Serbian New Year (Српска Нова година / Srpska Nova godina),[22] celebrated on January 14 as the start of the New Year by the Julian calendar. The Serbian Orthodox Church, with traditional adherence in Serbia (including Kosovo), Bosnia and HerzegovinaMontenegro and Croatia, celebrates its feasts and holidays according to the Julian calendar.[22] A part of the population celebrates Serbian New Year in a similar way as the New Year on January 1. This time, usually one concert is organized in front of either City Hall or the National Parliament (in Belgrade), while fireworks are prepared by the Serbian Orthodox Church and fired from the Church of Saint Sava, where people also gather. Other cities also organize such celebrations. Restaurants, clubs, cafes and hotels are usually fully booked and organize New Year’s celebrations with food and live music.[22]
  • In the Gwaun Valley, Pembrokeshire, Wales the new year is celebrated on January 13, based on the Julian calendar. See New Year celebrations in Gwaun Valley.

Middle Eastern

MUHARRAM
1
Sat Arab LeagueIsrael ( for native Arabs)
  • Hijri New Year in the Islamic culture is also known as Islamic new year (Arabic: رأس السنة الهجرية Ras as-Sanah al-Hijriyah) is the day that marks the beginning of a new Islamic calendar year. New Year moves from year to year because the Islamic calendar is a lunar calendar. The first day of the year is observed on the first day of Muharram, the first month in the Islamic calendar.
MAR
21±1
Wed Iran equinox
  • Nowruz also known as Persian New Year marks the first day of spring and the beginning of the year in the Iranian calendar. It is celebrated on the day of the astronomical vernal equinox, which usually occurs on March 21 or the previous/following day depending on where it is observed. Nowruz has been celebrated for over 3,000 years by the related cultural continent. The holiday is also celebrated and observed by many parts of Central AsiaSouth AsiaNorthwestern ChinaCrimea and some groups in the Balkans. As well as being a Zoroastrian holiday and having significance amongst the Zoroastrian ancestors of modern Iranians, the same time is celebrated in the Indian sub-continent as the new year. The moment the Sun crosses the celestial equator and equalizes night and day is calculated exactly every year and Iranian families gather together to observe the rituals.
TISHREI
½
Mon Israel
  • Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish new year, is celebrated by Jews in Israel and throughout the world. The date is not set according to the Gregorian calendar, but it always falls during September or October. The holiday is celebrated by religious services and special meals. The night of December 31/January 1, the New Year according to the Gregorian calendar, is also celebrated widely in Israel and is referred to as Sylvester or the civil new year.[23]

Traditional and modern celebrations and customs

New Year’s Eve

January 1 represents the fresh start of a new year after a period of remembrance of the passing year, including on radio, television, and in newspapers, which starts in early December in countries around the world. Publications have year-end articles that review the changes during the previous year. In some cases publications may set their entire year work alight in hope that the smoke emitted from the flame brings new life to the company. There are also articles on planned or expected changes in the coming year.

This day is traditionally a religious feast, but since the 1900s has also become an occasion to celebrate the night of December 31, called New Year’s Eve. There are fireworks at midnight at the moment the new year arrives (a major one is in Sydney, Australia). Watchnight services are also still observed by many.[24]

Regional celebrations

National celebrations

  • Throughout Great Britain there are many celebrations across the island, particularly in Scotland.
  • In Greece and Cyprus, families and relatives switch off the lights at midnight, then celebrate by cutting the vassilopita (Basil’s pie) which usually contains one coin or equivalent. Whoever wins expects luck for the whole year.[25] After the pie, a traditional game of cards called triantaena (31) follows.
  • In Nassau, Bahamas, the Junkanoo parade takes place.
  • In the Philippines, New Year’s is considered part of the Christmas holiday. Noise is made on New Year’s Eve with firecrackers and horns (amongst other methods) to dispel evil spirits and to prevent them from bringing bad luck to the coming new year. Tables are laden with food for the Media Noche (midnight meal), and a basket of twelve, different round fruits is displayed to symbolise prosperity in each of the coming twelve months.[26]Public New Year’s parties are organised by city governments, and are very well-attended.
  • In Russia and the other 14 former republics of the Soviet Union, the celebration of Novi God is greeted by fireworks and drinking champagne. Because religion was suppressed in the Soviet Union the New Year holiday took on many attributes associated with Christmas in other countries, including Christmas treesDed Moroz (a variant of Santa Claus) and family celebrations with lavish food and gifts. In Moscow, the president of Russia counts down the final seconds of the “old year”. The Kremlin‘s landmark Spassky Clock Tower chimes in the new year and then the anthem starts. It is customary to make a wish while the Clock chimes. The Old New Year is celebrated on January 13 (equivalent to January 1 in the “old style” Julian calendar). Although not an official holiday, it marks the end of the holiday season and is usually when people take down trees and other decorations.
  • In DavosSwitzerland, the final match of the Spengler Cup ice hockey Tournament is usually held on this day by tradition.
  • In the United States, it is traditional to spend this occasion together with loved ones. A toast is made to the new year, with kisses, fireworks and parties among the customs. It is popular to make a New Year’s resolution, although that is optional. In the country’s most famous New Year celebration in New York City, the 11,875-pound (5,386-kg), 12-foot-diameter (3.7-m) Times Square Ball located high above One Times Square is lowered starting at 11:59 pm, with a countdown from sixty seconds until one second, when it reaches the bottom of its tower. The arrival of the new year is announced at the stroke of midnight with fireworks, music and a live celebration that is broadcast worldwide. (Hundreds of local imitations of the ball drop also occur throughout the United States.)
  • In France,[27] some regard the weather as the prediction of that year: wind blowing east, fruit will yield; wind blowing west, fish and livestock will be bumper; wind blowing south, there will be good weather all year round and wind blowing north, there will be crop failure. People would like to toast for the new year.
  • In Spain, it is customary to have 12 grapes at hand when the clock strikes 12 at midnight. One grape is eaten on each stroke. If all the grapes are eaten within the period of the strikes, it means good luck in the new year.[28]
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Christmas in the United States of America

The United States of America has many different traditions and ways that people celebrate Christmas, because of its multi-cultural nature.

Many customs are similar to ones in the UK, France, Italy, The Netherlands, Poland and Mexico.

The traditional meal for Western European families is turkey or ham with cranberry sauce. Families from Eastern European origins favour turkey with trimmings, keilbasi (a Polish sausage), cabbage dishes, and soups; and some Italian families prefer lasagne!

Some Americans use pop-corn threaded on string to help decorate their Christmas Tree! Making gingerbread houses is also popular to make and eat at Christmas!

Embed from Getty Images

Many Americans, especially Christians will go to Church to celebrate the birth of Jesus at Christmas. Many churches have special Christmas Carol services and events where the story of Christmas is told.

In New England (the American States of Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine), there are shops called ‘Christmas Shops’ that only sell Christmas decorations and toys all the year round!

Americans also send out Christmas Cards, like Carol singing and there’s the unusual custom of the Christmas Pickle!

People in America like to decorate the outsides of their houses with lights and sometimes even statues of Santa Claus, Snowmen and Reindeer. Some cookies and glass of milk are often left out as a snack for Santa on Christmas Eve!

Embed from Getty Images

Towns and cities often decorate the streets with lights to celebrate Christmas. Perhaps the most famous Christmas street lights in the USA are at the Rockefeller Center in New York where there is a huge Christmas Tree with a public ice skating rink in front of it over Christmas and the New Year.

Embed from Getty Images

In Hawaii, Santa is called Kanakaloka!

Customs such as Mumming take place in some communities. On New Year’s Day in Philadelphia there is a Mummer’s Day parade which lasts over six hours! Clubs called “New Years Associations” perform in amazing costumes which take months to make. There are four categories (Comics, Fancies, String Bands, and Fancy Brigades) which are judged. You can find out more on the official website: www.phillymummers.com (goes to another site).

In the Southwest USA, there are some special customs which have some similarities to those in parts of Mexico. These include ‘luminarias’ or ‘farolitos’ which are paper sacks partly filled with sand and then have a candle put in them. They are lit on Christmas Eve and are put the edges of paths. They represent ‘lighting the way’ for somewhere for Mary and Joseph to stay.

A popular food at Christmas in the Southwest USA are tamales. You can find out more about Christmas traditions in the Southwest USA on www.lonestarwesterndecor.com/vibrant-christmas-traditions-of-the-southwest.html (goes to another site).

In the south of Louisiana, on Christmas Eve, families in small communities along the Mississippi River light bonfires along the levees (the high river banks) to help ‘Papa Noel’ (the name for Santa in French as Louisiana has a strong historical connection with France) find his way to the children’s homes!

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SALON Budapest,Luxury, uniqueness, quality

Luxury, uniqueness, quality

SALON Budapest, Hungary’s leading home design exhibition opens its doors in September

May it be a special yoga room, a grandiose closet or a sophisticated, well-designed living room that you dream off – this fall will make your dreams come true. Immerse in the newest trends, greatest ideas of interior design. Salon Budapest is Hungary’s first interior design expo that unites contemporary art, culture and the rich applied arts heritage of the country.

Salon Budapest will introduce the most significant players of Hungarian and international interior design and their newest creations for those preparing to redecorate or are about to build their dream home.

Between 21-23 September Budapest Aréna will become a magical exhibition space. Without the usual exhibitors’ stands – but filled with the carefully designed interiors, visitors will be able to freely discover the careful work of the best of the profession. Come to be inspired and be part of this magical experience – but don’t fret, you will leave with practical ideas, actual solutions.

If you are a design addict, thirsty for sophisticated pieces of art and unique solutions, and you believe in high quality and the power of personality – don’t miss out on this expo.

www.salonbudapest.hu

www.facebook.com/salonbudapest

www.instagram.com/salonbudapest

 

2018 World Cup Breaking News Lifestyle Technical Sports

Robbie Williams to perform at World Cup opening ceremony

Robbie Williams will perform at the opening ceremony of the World Cup in Moscow’s Luzhniki Stadium, just ahead of the opening game between Russia and Saudi Arabia.

The singer will be joined by Russian soprano Aida Garifullina, and – presumably not on vocals – former Brazilian international Ronaldo, part of the winning teams in 1994 and 2002.

Williams said he was “happy and excited” and that the performance was the fulfilment of a boyhood dream, promising an “unforgettable show”. The former Take That star is a keen footballer – on Sunday he led an England side to victory in the Soccer Aid charity football event, featuring other stars including Usain Bolt and Mo Farah. He also founded the LA Vale football team while living in Los Angeles.

His Moscow performance comes two years on from his tongue-in-cheek single Party Like a Russian, which offended some Russian listeners with its lyrics about an oligarch: “Alleviate the cash from a whole entire nation / Take my loose change and build my own space station.”

Fifa says the opening ceremony will take place much closer to kick-off than usual, just 30 minutes before the start of the opening match. There has been no mention of a performance of the official World Cup song, Live It Up, featuring film star Will Smith, Colombia-based pop star Nicky Jam, and Kosovan singer Era Istrefi.

Ronaldo called the opening match “very symbolic … After so much hard work, suddenly the whole world is gathered in your backyard to celebrate their love for football. I felt that in Brazil four years ago and I am now happy to share this excitement with the Russians as well.

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Budapest has Europe’s most popular VIP cinema

As funzine  states, renovation of the Cinema City Aréna started last year with one billion forints (about three million euros).
All seats and carpets are brand new (including the Simple IMAX cinema), and two rooms are equipped with Dolby Atmos audio systems. The Szerencsejáték VIP cinema is fully renovated as well.
New features After the renovation, the VIP section is waiting for its guests with an original conception. You can choose from the chef’s menu and enjoy the limitless popcorn and nachos buffet. Besides, the staff members will serve alcoholic drinks to you. 2D tickets cost 5490 forints (17 euros), 3D tickets cost 5970 forints (18 euros).
The new Cinema City Aréna VIP Cinema City Aréna Megaplex is a unique member of Cinema City, a European cinema network. It opened on the 17th of January, 2008 with 23 rooms. The cinema chain opened a VIP cinema in Hungary for the first time. Then, its design was introduced in many other countries. This time, the cinema will reopen on the 13th of February 2018. with a brand-new style. The current programme includes Valami Amerika 3. (a Hungarian movie), Black Panther and Fifty Shades of Grey.
Watching a movie with extras
Now, the new cinema is able to accommodate 176 people. Not only the furniture but also the interior style has changed a lot. First of all, darker shades and different lighting is the trend. Therefore, the design bright and modern. The wooden surfaces and the new furniture highlight the new look. Furthermore, in Cinema City Aréna Szerencsejáték VIP, chefs will prepare the food for the guests so they can enjoy the movie with three-course meals (soups, main dishes, and deserts). Additionally, there is going to be thematic evenings and seasonally changing menus in the future.

Andrea Buda, marketing director at Cinema City, said that: “This was the biggest renovation in the cinema during the last ten years. Aréna is the most popular cinema in Hungary, and this is why it is essential for the guests to be able to have fun in a pleasant atmosphere. The 1,2 million forints renovation of Cinema City Aréna was part of our last year’s plan. The next step is going to be the opening of a 4D cinema in Debrecen in the middle of March. We are also planning to install more Dolby Atmos audio systems as well as renovating other cinemas.” Here, you can find more information about the renovation of cinemas. If you are interested in on of the most beautiful cinemas around the globe, click here.

(Featured image: MTI/Márton Mónus)

ALL SPORTS Breaking News Lifestyle Technical Sports Top news

Live Tuning – preparation for the 23-25th of March Car show

Presented on the 29th January Press conference in Western City Center, the Audi TT was presented which was rebuild only within a couple of days ahead of the viewers, using only legal and safe car tuning parts.

During the four days rebuilding the visitors can follow the 6 workers who rebuilt the car – which will be shortly a car for one of the luckly winners.

In March the Tuning Show will occupy 6 pavilons and a huge outside area in Hungexpo, Budapest, where all visitors have a change to look some old and the future car wonders. Besides the exhibitions there whould be other programmes, races and shows for all ages.

Carstyling.hu Tuning Show – the biggest hungarian autotuning show
New cars exhibition– salon cars, dealers and present concepts
EV-GreenTech – electric cars exhibition avaible supply
Classic Automobil Show – rebuild and old timers cars
Hungarians in the car produce of the world – Famous hungarian peoples in the car indrusties
DRIFT and GYMKHANA Championship – races
OFF-ROAD Show – Off road on the bulid track
Hot Rod Show – modified cars
Tuning meet and exhibition- clubs, hundreds of cars
Top Cars – exlusive cars of the car indrusties
SUV Zone – freetime cars exhibition
All day programs – indoor and outdoor for the families

Automobil and Tuning Show will be open:
23-24th March between 9am and 7pm, on 25th March between 9am till 6pm.

Further details:
www.amts.hu / www.facebook.com/carstyling
Videos:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCD37vqm6Gw5_2cDqPiMFCRg

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Happy New Year 2018!!

Did you know that New Year’s has not always been celebrated on January 1? Get the full story.

Civilizations around the world have been celebrating the start of each new year for at least four millennia. Today, most New Year’s festivities begin on December 31 (New Year’s Eve), the last day of the Gregorian calendar, and continue into the early hours of January 1 (New Year’s Day). Common traditions include attending parties, eating special New Year’s foods, making resolutions for the new year and watching fireworks displays.

Early New Year’s Celebrations

The earliest recorded festivities in honor of a new year’s arrival date back some 4,000 years to ancient Babylon. For the Babylonians, the first new moon following the vernal equinox—the day in late March with an equal amount of sunlight and darkness—heralded the start of a new year. They marked the occasion with a massive religious festival called Akitu (derived from the Sumerian word for barley, which was cut in the spring) that involved a different ritual on each of its 11 days. In addition to the new year, Atiku celebrated the mythical victory of the Babylonian sky god Marduk over the evil sea goddess Tiamat and served an important political purpose: It was during this time that a new king was crowned or that the current ruler’s divine mandate was symbolically renewed.

Did You Know?

In order to realign the Roman calendar with the sun, Julius Caesar had to add 90 extra days to the year 46 B.C. when he introduced his new Julian calendar.

Throughout antiquity, civilizations around the world developed increasingly sophisticated calendars, typically pinning the first day of the year to an agricultural or astronomical event. In Egypt, for instance, the year began with the annual flooding of the Nile, which coincided with the rising of the star Sirius. The first day of the Chinese new year, meanwhile, occurred with the second new moon after the winter solstice.

January 1 Becomes New Year’s Day

The early Roman calendar consisted of 10 months and 304 days, with each new year beginning at the vernal equinox; according to tradition, it was created by Romulus, the founder of Rome, in the eighth century B.C. A later king, Numa Pompilius, is credited with adding the months of Januarius and Februarius. Over the centuries, the calendar fell out of sync with the sun, and in 46 B.C. the emperor Julius Caesar decided to solve the problem by consulting with the most prominent astronomers and mathematicians of his time. He introduced the Julian calendar, which closely resembles the more modern Gregorian calendar that most countries around the world use today.

As part of his reform, Caesar instituted January 1 as the first day of the year, partly to honor the month’s namesake: Janus, the Roman god of beginnings, whose two faces allowed him to look back into the past and forward into the future. Romans celebrated by offering sacrifices to Janus, exchanging gifts with one another, decorating their homes with laurel branches and attending raucous parties. In medieval Europe, Christian leaders temporarily replaced January 1 as the first of the year with days carrying more religious significance, such as December 25 (the anniversary of Jesus’ birth) and March 25 (the Feast of the Annunciation); Pope Gregory XIII reestablished January 1 as New Year’s Day in 1582.

New Year’s Traditions

In many countries, New Year’s celebrations begin on the evening of December 31—New Year’s Eve—and continue into the early hours of January 1. Revelers often enjoy meals and snacks thought to bestow good luck for the coming year. In Spain and several other Spanish-speaking countries, people bolt down a dozen grapes-symbolizing their hopes for the months ahead-right before midnight. In many parts of the world, traditional New Year’s dishes feature legumes, which are thought to resemble coins and herald future financial success; examples include lentils in Italy and black-eyed peas in the southern United States. Because pigs represent progress and prosperity in some cultures, pork appears on the New Year’s Eve table in Cuba, Austria, Hungary, Portugal and other countries. Ring-shaped cakes and pastries, a sign that the year has come full circle, round out the feast in the Netherlands, Mexico, Greece and elsewhere. In Sweden and Norway, meanwhile, rice pudding with an almond hidden inside is served on New Year’s Eve; it is said that whoever finds the nut can expect 12 months of good fortune.

Other customs that are common worldwide include watching fireworks and singing songs to welcome the new year, including the ever-popular “Auld Lang Syne” in many English-speaking countries. The practice of making resolutions for the new year is thought to have first caught on among the ancient Babylonians, who made promises in order to earn the favor of the gods and start the year off on the right foot. (They would reportedly vow to pay off debts and return borrowed farm equipment.)

In the United States, the most iconic New Year’s tradition is the dropping of a giant ball in New York City’s Times Square at the stroke of midnight. Millions of people around the world watch the event, which has taken place almost every year since 1907. Over time, the ball itself has ballooned from a 700-pound iron-and-wood orb to a brightly patterned sphere 12 feet in diameter and weighing in at nearly 12,000 pounds. Various towns and cities across America have developed their own versions of the Times Square ritual, organizing public drops of items ranging from pickles (Dillsburg, Pennsylvania) to possums (Tallapoosa, Georgia) at midnight on New Year’s Eve.

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Calendar of the major sporting events of the year 2018

This calendar is based on data available to the-Sports.org. It includes major sporting events from the previous year 2018.

If the calendar seems incomplete, rest assured that events will be added with complete data.

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A new study programme for sport establishment managers to be launched at King Sigismund University

According to GLOBS Magazine, a cooperation framework agreement was signed by the University of Physical Education and the King Sigismund University concerning a three-semester postgraduate study programme for sport establishment management, which will be launched at the King Sigismund University (ZSKE) with the professional support of the University of Physical Education in the February of 2018.

The agreement was signed by Dr Péter Szatmári CSs, rector of the King Sigismund University and Prof Dr h.c. Lajos Mocsai, rector of the University of Physical Education. The reason behind the agreement is that both universities have a lot of experience and expertise in the educational fields of physical education, medicine, sport, diplomacy, economy, communication and media science.

The newly built sport establishments increased the need for special expertise, because the operation of sport establishments is very different from the operation of other facilities. The aim of the new postgraduate specialisation that will be launched at the King Sigismund University in the spring semester of the 2017/2018 academic year is to train sport experts capable of managing sport establishments with the help of the acquired theoretical and practical skills.

With the help of their managing skills and experience in the professional field, students will contribute to the development and enrichment of the sport, recreational and mental hygienic culture. Sport establishment managers will be able to find a position in sport federations, sport organisations, institutions dealing with the operation of establishments, sport enterprises and multifunctional institutions.

The list of lecturers includes such dignities as Dr István Simicskó, Minister of Defence, Dr Tünde Szabó, State Secretary for Sport, Andor Tompa, president of the Hungarian Association of Sport Establishments, Zoltán Molnár, managing director of the Budapest Sport Provider Centre Nonprofit Ltd. of public utility, and Attila Császári, sport marketing manager of Adidas Budapest Ltd.