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Froome disappoints in time trial as Wellens wins Ruta del Sol

Chris Froome finished a disappointing 11th in the final-stage time trial as Tim Wellens wrapped up overall victory in the Ruta del Sol.

Froome had been expected to challenge for the stage victory on Sunday, having all but written off his chances of an overall win earlier in the week.

However, the four-time Tour de France winner, who had vowed to “empty the tank”, was 27 seconds slower than Team Sky colleague David de la Cruz – the victor in the fifth and final stage.

The result left Froome 10th overall on his comeback, competing for the first time since he returned an adverse analytical finding at last year’s Vuelta a Espana. Froome denies any wrongdoing.

Lotto Soudal rider Wellens did enough on the time trial to end the race eight seconds clear of Sky’s Wout Poels, who went sixth-quickest on Sunday.

Marc Soler of Movistar completed the the top three in the general classification, a further 19 seconds back.

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Copeland: Most teams would suspend Froome

Bahrain-Merida team manager Brent Copeland believes that Chris Froome should sit out of racing while his Salbutamol case is resolved.

Froome returned an adverse analytical finding (AAF) for double the allowable limit of the asthma medication during this year’s Vuelta a España.

Froome was notified of the findings on September 20, but the issue only came to light on Wednesday through revelations from Le Monde and the Guardian. Copeland emphasised that his issue was not with Froome or Team Sky themselves, but argued that continuing to ride while the case is ongoing gives cycling a bad public image.

“I’ve known Chris for years, and I must be very clear that this isn’t against him. I think that Chris can come back stronger than before, I know him and his mindset,” Copeland told Cyclingnews at Bahrain-Merida’s training camp in Croatia.

“If you have a code of conduct or an ethics code then you should follow that. September 20 is when they were notified and Chris still presented himself at several events and [Team Sky] were negotiating with RCS about the participation of him at the Giro d’Italia, knowing what they had on their plate, which is difficult for me to understand as a manager.

“Even if he is banned for nine months, eight months, or whatever the case is, he could still ride the Giro d’Italia. But in the meantime, the code of conduct of most teams would dictate that the rider should be suspended.”

Copeland has personal experience of this situation after Diego Ulissi returned an adverse analytical finding for similar levels of the same medication at the 2014 Giro d’Italia.

Ulissi was suspended by the team following notification of the finding that June. He made a brief return to racing at the one-day GP Banca di Legnano in September 2014, but was subsequently sidelined again until the case was resolved. Following a lengthy procedure, where Ulissi underwent medical tests, the Italian was handed a nine-month suspension in January 2015.

Copeland defend the use of Salbutamol, saying that there is a genuine medical need by some riders.

“I know that there is a lot of criticism from the public on this but a lot of people don’t understand the conditions that riders compete under,” he said.

“You’re riding through different climatic conditions all the time and unfortunately they do suffer from asthma and a lot of riders do use this substance to help them out. If it is accepted by the international medical regulations then it is fine to use. Obviously, it shouldn’t be abused.

As well as questioning the decision to allow Froome to continue racing while the case is ongoing, Copeland took a swipe at the UCI’s licence commission.

The WorldTour licences for 2018 were announced on Monday, with Team Sky among the 14 teams to be given an automatic licence. Teams must adhere to several criteria to gain a licence and, given the current situation, the Bahrain-Merida team manager couldn’t understand why Team Sky weren’t brought in front of the commission at any point. The commission held their hearings at the end of November, two months after Froome and Team Sky were notified of the AAF.

“[The licence criteria] has been good for cycling because it has brought a lot of professionalism,” Copeland explained.

“It is ethics, financial, sporting and organisational and if anything is out of line in one of those criteria then you are called in front of the licence commission to give your reasoning of the situation before the licence is given. When the decision of the licence commission came out on Monday, it said without giving a reason, because that is confidential, but Sky was not one of them.

“The question I ask myself is that this case has been going on since the September 20 when they knew about the excess levels of Salbutamol and they weren’t called in front of the licence commission. Once again, it’s difficult to explain to the man in the pub and it causes confusion. This is what makes me angry about the situation.”

Copeland’s team would be set to gain if Froome is suspended as a result of the Salbutamol adverse analytical finding. Vincenzo Nibali finished second behind Froome at the Vuelta a España and would be named winner of the race if Froome is handed a ban and loses his Vuelta victory.

However, Copeland said that there would be no pleasure in gaining the win in that manner.

“Getting a win on the green table doesn’t mean anything. Nobody wants to win that way,” he said.

“Nobody is going to be opening champagne bottles and saying ‘yes, we won the Vuelta’ because Froome was suspended. If he is suspended, it will surely be disappointing, not only for us not standing on the top step but Kelderman didn’t even stand on the podium, but also for the world of cycling.

“It’s a cloud over cycling and everybody’s head, especially Chris’ head. We’ve got to explain to the sponsors and go back to the teams and explain what the situation is. Nobody really wants to know the details and say that cycling is doping again.”

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Chris Froome to ride cobbled section before 2018 race

Four-time Tour de France champion Chris Froome plans to ride the cobbled section of next year’s route to help prepare for the race.

The 2018 Tour, which runs from 7-29 July, features 22km of cobbled road on stage nine from Arras to Roubaix.

“Those first nine days could be extremely crucial,” said the 32-year-old Briton, who rides for Team Sky.

“It’s not a part where you could win the race but it’s certainly a part where you could lose it.”

Froome has won the Tour in four of the past five years, withdrawing in 2014 after crashing twice on stage five.

The race, which will start in the Vendee region of France, also contains a team time trial in Cholet on stage three and two ascents of the Mur de Bretagne on stage six.

Froome this year became only the third person to win the Tour and the Vuelta a Espana in the same season.

He told BBC Radio 5 live that the Tour route “is getting more and more challenging and every year”.

“I might try to have a look at some of those cobbled sections myself and go and ride them,” he said.

“I don’t have any plans to ride Paris-Roubaix or any of the one-day spring Classics, but I understand the Tour de France will incorporate some of those cobble sections from Paris-Roubaix, so I must get up there and test them out and make decision on wheels and tyres and other technical things.

“Each Tour de France I’ve won now has been a completely different challenge and that’s one of the things that makes the Tour special. We have a bit of everything.”

Froome is aiming to become the fifth rider to win the Tour five times, after Jacques Anquetil, Eddy Merckx, Benard Hinault and Miguel Indurain.

The 2018 route is the shortest this century at 3,329km.

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Froome still rides under radar despite epic feats

LONDON- French great Bernard Hinault believes Chris Froome could target a sweep of all three Grand Tours next year — a feat previously assumed to be mission impossible in cycling.

That is what it might take, however, if Froome is to finally force himself into the wider consciousness of a British public still strangely nonplussed by his pedalling prowess.

“Froome is definitely the champion of his generation,” Hinault, who did the double in 1978, said in The Times. “He dominates, he leads the field. He adapts his style depending on his rivals.”

Hinault thinks Froome could end all the arguments if he took on the Giro, Tour and Vuelta next year. “I even think it’s possible to win the three grand tours,” he said.

Froome has already said a fifth Tour de France is his priority next season but left the door open for cycling equivalent of the “grand slam”.

“A fifth Tour would be the golden prize. But at the same time, who knows?” he said. “It is a risk, definitely, because you are always going to be on that knife edge physically.”

On Sunday Team Sky rider Froome was confirmed as the winner of the Vuelta — reckoned to be tougher this year than the Giro d‘Italia and Tour de France — becoming the first Briton to complete the race in the red jersey.

It came just 49 days after standing on top of the podium in the yellow jersey in Paris, having claimed a fourth Tour de France title to become the first man since Spain’s Miguel Indurain to win three in a row.

Froome is only the third rider to win the Tour and Vuelta in the same year but the first to do so since the Vuelta was moved to later into the furnace-like Spanish summer.

To do it involved a total ride of 6,862km over 73 mountain summits and 165 hours in the saddle.

Yet despite his superhuman efforts Froome’s achievement will not resonate around Britain in the same way Andy Murray’s two Wimbledon titles or Mo Farah’s world and Olympic golds did.

“I‘m not going to hold my breath,” Froome said when asked whether he might make the shortlist for the BBC’s prestigious Sports Personality having been overlooked last year.

Froome’s natural modesty and the fact that the respect of those within cycling — fellow riders and fans who follow the sport closely — counts more to him than celebrity status means he is unlikely to lose sleep.

NATURAL SHOWMAN

Yet it is curious that Britain has not taken the Kenya-born cyclist to its heart like Belgium-born Bradley Wiggins when he became the first Briton to win the Tour in 2012.

Showman Wiggins was not shy of the spotlight and knew how to celebrate, whereas father-of-one Froome comes across as the kind of guy who would settle for a quiet glass of wine and night in.

Question marks about Team Sky’s reputation following a UK Anti-Doping investigation into a “jiffy bag” delivered to Wiggins at the 2011 Dauphine remain, with Wiggins’s former team mate Froome inevitably dragged into the debate despite no suggestion of any wrongdoing on his part.

In fact, French fans, some of whom threw urine at him at the 2015 Tour in response to suggestions he was doping, have been won over by Froome’s class, on and off the bike.

Froome just gets on with the business of riding his bike longer and harder than anyone else.

And while his head-bobbing style upsets the purists and the smothering tactics of the relentless Team Sky domestiques attract scorn, Froome has to be regarded alongside the all-time greats and possibly above Alberto Contador despite the Spaniard’s seven Grand Tour wins.
(Martyn Herman)

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Chris Froome seals Vuelta a España title to win historic Vuelta-Tour double

Chris Froome secured his maiden Vuelta a España title in Madrid on Sunday evening and became the first cyclist to win the Spanish grand tour in the same year as the Tour de France since Bernard Hinault in 1978.

Having built up a lead of 2min 15sec over his closest rival, Vincenzo Nibali, through 20 stages of racing, Froome enjoyed an incident-free procession from Arroyomolinos to the Spanish capital alongside his team who had worked so hard for their leader’s cause, sharing beers and taking selfies on route.

In a bunch sprint on Madrid’s Paseo della Castellana, Matteo Trentin won the stage on the line, which seemed to be enough to win the best sprinter’s green jersey too, but Froome battled to finish 11th and hold on to green in addition to the overall winner’s red jersey and the combined classification’s white jersey.

Trentin had needed to win the intermediate sprint at 84km to have any chance of claiming the sprint crown and although he did so, Froome made his intentions clear, pushing all the way for the minor points on offer.

From there Trentin’s Quick-Step Floors team took control, chasing down a breakaway trio of Rui Costa, Alessandro De Marchi and Nick Schultz before putting their man in position to sprint for the stage win. But Froome chased hard to ensure another jersey added to the collection as he sealed another grand tour triumph in style.

Alberto Contador, on his final grand tour, did a lap of honour around the streets of Madrid after the race holding a Spanish flag aloft. The three-time Vuelta champion, who won the penultimate stage of the race, finished fifth in the general classification.

The Belgian rider Jolien D’Hoore earlier won the women’s 87km Madrid Challenge for the second year in a row for Wiggle High5, seeing off the challenge of Australia’s Chloe Hosking.

Final general classification

1 Christopher Froome (Gbr) Team Sky 82h 30m 02s,
2 Vincenzo Nibali (Ita) Bahrain-Merida at 2m 15s,
3 Ilnur Zakarin (Rus) Katusha-Alpecin at 2:51,
4 Wilco Kelderman (Ned) Team Sunweb at 3:15,
5 Alberto Contador (Spa) Trek-Segafredo at 3:18,
6 Wout Poels (Ned) Team Sky at 6:59,
7 Michael Woods (Can) Cannondale-Drapac at 8:27,
8 Miguel Ángel López (Col) Astana Pro Team at 9:13,
9 Steven Kruijswijk (Ned) Team LottoNL-Jumbo 11:18,
10 Tejay van Garderen (USA) BMC Racing Team 15:50

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Chris Froome’s six-year quest to win Vuelta a España rests on Alto de l’Angliru

It is six years since Chris Froome climbed the Alto de l’Angliru in the 2011 Vuelta a España with a brief to support his team leader, Bradley Wiggins, who was wearing the red leader’s jersey and was within sight of his maiden grand tour win a week from Madrid.

Froome, who had been a virtually unknown domestic with Team Sky until he beat Wiggins in a time trial in the Vuelta that September, did his best to support him when he was attacked by the Spanish climber Juan José Cobo, sticking with the race leader until he was ordered to ride for himself in pursuit of Cobo.

By then it was too late; Cobo had flown, and although Froome would close to within 13sec overall by winning the stage at Peña Cabarga, that Vuelta would be filed on the “might have been” shelf for him and Sky. The team finished second and third in a race that would come to be seen as a breakthrough for the British squad.

Since then, Froome has persistently targetted the Vuelta, finishing second twice more, and once taking fourth; in that time he and Sky have grown to become the most feared unit in world cycling, albeit with a few caveats. Between Froome and Wiggins, they have taken five Tour de France victories in six years, but they have yet to win the Giro or the Vuelta.

They have also inspired almost continual controversy, beginning with the questions at that Vuelta over whether or not they should have supported Froome from the off. Not to mention the question of who Froome actually was and where he had emerged from. The Vuelta and the Tour have been relatively devoid of debate but the background of a stressful year of parliamentary and Ukad inquiries remains, as does the question of just what was done with the 55 doses of cortisone bought by the team between the end of 2010 and 2013.

If Froome seals his long-sought Vuelta victory on Saturday, it will mark the end of a six-year quest and there could be few more distinguished locations for such a feat, which would make Froome the first cyclist since Bernard Hinault to win the Tour and Vuelta in the same year. The Angliru has gained immense notoriety since its first inclusion in the route in 1999 in an overt attempt to match the Tour and Giro’s most feared ascents. In 2002, it became truly famous when David Millar was inspired to stop and hand in his race number, a symbolic single metre from the finish line as a protest against the toughness of the climb and the danger of the descent of the Col de Cobertoria, which leads to its foot.

The Angliru is 12.5km long, with a maximum gradient of 24% – close to one in four – and its inception marked the beginning of a search among grand tour organisers for ever steeper and more extreme ascents such as Monte Zoncolan in the Giro and Les Lacets de Montvernier in the Tour. Wednesday’s Vuelta finish on the mountain goat track at Los Machucos – barely feasible for a car in places let alone a bicycle – was another from the same mould.

With its length and difficulty, on the Angliru Froome’s overall victory is by no means assured. He has a buffer of 1min 37sec to defend from Vincenzo Nibali, with Wilco Kelderman and Ilnur Zakarin lurking within three minutes. An unlucky crash or mechanical fault, or a repeat of the weakness that saw Nibali and all the other overall contenders gain time on Wednesday would make the race completely open.

That uncertainty is totally fitting in a race which Froome and Sky have dominated since he moved into the lead on stage three but, paradoxically, without ever truly managing a single knockout blow. As he did in the Tour de France in July, Froome has gained time gradually and inexorably on the opposition, opening gaps of any true significance only in Tuesday’s time trial in Navarra. These were almost instantly countered the following day when the Sky leader faded en route to Los Machucos.

Fitting the pattern of nip and tuck, having ridden Nibali, Kelderman and Zakarin off his wheel in the final kilometre on Friday, Froome was again put under pressure by Alberto Contador, who attacked on the day’s final climb, the Alto de San Martín de Huerces, gaining 45sec at one point. Riding the last grand tour of his distinguished career, Contador has been a bugbear for the past fortnight, and the Sky leader must be thanking his lucky stars the treble Vuelta winner lost valuable time in Andorra owing to stomach pains.

Contador did not threaten Froome’s overall lead en route to Gijón but he was able to link up with a team-mate Edward Theuns. His attack then met the usual steamroller response from Team Sky in the final kilometres, with the quadruple Tour winner’s team receiving assistance from Sunweb, who felt Contador might threaten the third place overall of Kelderman, their leader. Contador was swept up by the peloton 2.5km from the finish.

The stage win went to the Belgian Thomas De Gendt, making it a double for the Lotto-Soudal team after his team-mate Sander Armée’s victory on Thursday. Like Armée, De Gendt was a member of a large breakaway that included no one of any danger overall – a group who now include most of the field so large are the time gaps behind Froome. Another Belgian stage win continued a pattern in this Vuelta, which has yet to see a Spanish stage victory in almost three weeks of racing. Froome and Nibali are not the only ones who will be feeling the strain as the Angliru approaches.

(William Fotheringham)

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Vuelta a Espana: Froome wins stage 16 time trial

Chris Froome (Team Sky) extended his overall lead at the Vuelta a Espana with a commanding win in the 40.2-kilometre time trial on stage 16.

The race leader edged out Wilco Kelderman (Team Sunweb) by 29 seconds with Vincenzo Nibali in third at 57 seconds.

Froome completed the time trial course in a time of 47:00 to buffer his lead over Nibali in the GC to 1:58. Kelderman’s performance was enough to edge him ahead of Ilnur Zakarin for a spot on the podium with five stages remaining.

Alberto Contador (Trek Segafredo) finished fifth on the stage and moved up to fifth on GC. There were poor performances from Fabio Aru (Astana) and Esteban Chaves (Orica Scott), who both lost considerable time and fell down the standings. With less than a week of the Vuelta remaining Froome is on course to complete a rare Tour de France and Vuelta double.

The Team Sky leader looked in control throughout the stage, and although he was slightly down on a handful of riders at the first time check at 13 kilometres, his incessantly consistent pace wore down the likes of Kelderman and Contador – the latter of whom starting strongly but was unable to hold back the tide of Froome’s dominance in the second half of the test.

Fabio Aru’s 26th place, 3:03 down on Froome – effectively ended his podium hopes, while Chaves’ 4:01 loss to Froome saw him drop from fifth to ninth in the overall standings.

Nibali – who came into the stage hoping to limit his loses to Froome to around 30 seconds – put in a consistent performance and clawed back time on several rivals in the second half of the race but he conceded time to Froome with every passing kilometre and was forced to settle for a respectable but nevertheless GC-damaging third place. He remains Froome’s closest challenger but must hope for a monumental off-day or a mistake for the Team Sky rider in order to win his second Vuelta.
Contador rises as Chaves falls

There was an air of inevitability as the sun beat down on the Vuelta, and the remaining riders warmed up for the first test after Monday’s rest day. Chris Froome took up his position on Team Sky’s new juggernaut, tapping away on the rollers as one-by-one riders siphoned off from the start-ramp.

Lennard Kemna (Team Sunweb) and Tobias Ludvigsson (FDJ) posted early lead times but when Alberto Contador made his way to the starting house the race interest rose significantly. This was, of course, Contador’s final time trial and the Spaniard looked focussed as he set off on the motor racing circuit that occupied the first kilometers of the stage. The Spaniard set the fastest time at the first check but the script of Froome winning – convincingly at least – looked in threat when the Sky rider came through the first time check 10 seconds slower than Kelderman and five seconds down on his eternal Spanish rival.

Kelderman, who has gone unnoticed for much of this race, was producing the time trial of his life. He devoured Chaves for two minutes in the opening half of the individual test and whizzed through the first check a full 18 seconds ahead of Contador. A Froome whitewash looked in real jeopardy.

Yet by the next check at 27.9 kilometers normality had been restored. Froome had etched ahead of Kelderman by seven seconds as Contador began to slowly fade. Zakarin remained in strong while Nibali had pulled himself further into contention and was just four seconds shy of Contador.

The Trek-Segafredo leader was the first rider to dip under 48 minutes as he sparked a flurry of fast finishes. Kelderman was next home in a time of 47:29 with Zakarin dropped to fourth in GC as a result. As Nibali entered the last kilometer it was clear that Froome was closing but the Italian’s time of 47:57 was enough to take third on the stage. He held one of his main rivals to 30 seconds but that it was Kelderman and not Froome perhaps illustrated the growing divide between the race leader and the rest.

Full Results
# Rider Name (Country) Team Result
1 Christopher Froome (GBr) Team Sky 0:47:00
2 Wilco Kelderman (Ned) Team Sunweb 0:00:29
3 Vincenzo Nibali (Ita) Bahrain-Merida 0:00:57
4 Ilnur Zakarin (Rus) Katusha-Alpecin 0:00:59
5 Alberto Contador Velasco (Spa) Trek-Segafredo
6 Tobias Ludvigsson (Swe) FDJ 0:01:07
7 Wout Poels (Ned) Team Sky 0:01:11
8 Lennard Kämna (Ger) Team Sunweb 0:01:30
9 Bob Jungels (Lux) Quick-Step Floors 0:01:41
10 Daniel Oss (Ita) BMC Racing Team 0:01:49
11 Alexis Gougeard (Fra) AG2R La Mondiale 0:01:50
12 Tejay van Garderen (USA) BMC Racing Team 0:01:55
13 Yves Lampaert (Bel) Quick-Step Floors 0:02:07
14 Steven Kruijswijk (Ned) Team LottoNL-Jumbo 0:02:09
15 Matteo Trentin (Ita) Quick-Step Floors 0:02:12
16 Stef Clement (Ned) Team LottoNL-Jumbo 0:02:15
17 Niki Terpstra (Ned) Quick-Step Floors 0:02:17
18 Peter Koning (Ned) Aqua Blue Sport 0:02:19
19 Thomas De Gendt (Bel) Lotto Soudal 0:02:25
20 David de la Cruz (Spa) Quick-Step Floors 0:02:27
21 Lasse Norman Hansen (Den) Aqua Blue Sport 0:02:30
22 Miguel Angel Lopez (Col) Astana Pro Team 0:02:34
23 Alexey Lutsenko (Kaz) Astana Pro Team 0:02:46
24 Nelson Oliveira (Por) Movistar Team 0:02:47
25 Luis León Sánchez (Spa) Astana Pro Team 0:02:49
26 Fabio Aru (Ita) Astana Pro Team 0:03:03
27 Stéphane Rossetto (Fra) Cofidis, Solutions Credits 0:03:08
28 Anthony Roux (Fra) FDJ 0:03:11
29 Nicolas Roche (Irl) BMC Racing Team 0:03:12
30 Lluís Guillermo Mas Bonet (Spa) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 0:03:14
31 Markel Irizar Aranburu (Spa) Trek-Segafredo 0:03:20
32 Julian Alaphilippe (Fra) Quick-Step Floors
33 Koen Bouwman (Ned) Team LottoNL-Jumbo 0:03:30
34 Søren Kragh Andersen (Den) Team Sunweb 0:03:31
35 Marc Soler (Spa) Movistar Team 0:03:37
36 Maxime Monfort (Bel) Lotto Soudal
37 Michael Woods (Can) Cannondale-Drapac 0:03:40
38 Louis Meintjes (RSA) UAE Team Emirates 0:03:42
39 Ian Stannard (GBr) Team Sky 0:03:53
40 Anthony Perez (Fra) Cofidis, Solutions Credits 0:03:54
41 Hugo Houle (Can) AG2R La Mondiale
42 Francisco Ventoso (Spa) BMC Racing Team 0:03:56
43 Aaron Gate (NZl) Aqua Blue Sport 0:03:57
44 Rafael Reis (Por) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 0:04:00
45 Johan Esteban Chaves Rubio (Col) Orica-Scott 0:04:01
46 Daniel Moreno Fernandez (Spa) Movistar Team
47 Jan Polanc (Slo) UAE Team Emirates 0:04:06
48 Christian Knees (Ger) Team Sky 0:04:13
49 Matej Mohoric (Slo) UAE Team Emirates 0:04:14
50 Adam Yates (GBr) Orica-Scott 0:04:15
51 Diego Rosa (Ita) Team Sky 0:04:20
52 Jacques Janse van Rensburg (RSA) Dimension Data 0:04:26
53 Alberto Losada Alguacil (Spa) Katusha-Alpecin 0:04:30
54 Rui Alberto Faria da Costa (Por) UAE Team Emirates 0:04:31
55 Odd Christian Eiking (Nor) FDJ
56 Stefan Denifl (Aut) Aqua Blue Sport 0:04:32
57 Bart De Clercq (Bel) Lotto Soudal
58 Edward Theuns (Bel) Trek-Segafredo 0:04:33
59 Jelle Wallays (Bel) Lotto Soudal 0:04:34
60 Mikel Nieve Ituralde (Spa) Team Sky 0:04:35
61 Thomas Scully (NZl) Cannondale-Drapac 0:04:36
62 Daan Olivier (Ned) Team LottoNL-Jumbo 0:04:38
63 Ivan Garcia Cortina (Spa) Bahrain-Merida 0:04:41
64 Julien Duval (Fra) AG2R La Mondiale
65 Enric Mas (Spa) Quick-Step Floors 0:04:42
66 Chad Haga (USA) Team Sunweb 0:04:43
67 Alessandro De Marchi (Ita) BMC Racing Team 0:04:44
68 Koen de Kort (Ned) Trek-Segafredo 0:04:45
69 Pawel Poljanski (Pol) Bora-Hansgrohe
70 Sergio Pardilla Bellon (Spa) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 0:04:46
71 Ricardo Vilela (Por) Manzana Postobon 0:04:47
72 Maxim Belkov (Rus) Katusha-Alpecin 0:04:49
73 Eros Capecchi (Ita) Quick-Step Floors 0:04:52
74 Rein Taaramäe (Est) Katusha-Alpecin 0:04:53
75 Tim Declercq (Bel) Quick-Step Floors 0:04:56
76 Simon Clarke (Aus) Cannondale-Drapac 0:04:57
77 Magnus Cort (Den) Orica-Scott 0:05:02
78 Przemyslaw Niemiec (Pol) UAE Team Emirates 0:05:05
79 Jarlinson Pantano (Col) Trek-Segafredo 0:05:06
80 Diego Rubio (Spa) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA
81 Emanuel Buchmann (Ger) Bora-Hansgrohe
82 Hector Sáez Benito (Spa) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 0:05:08
83 Bernardo Suaza (Col) Manzana Postobon 0:05:17
84 Salvatore Puccio (Ita) Team Sky
85 David Lopez Garcia (Spa) Team Sky 0:05:20
86 Julien Bernard (Fra) Trek-Segafredo 0:05:22
87 Nicholas Schultz (Aus) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 0:05:24
88 Jose Joaquin Rojas Gil (Spa) Movistar Team 0:05:25
89 Giovanni Visconti (Ita) Bahrain-Merida 0:05:29
90 Franco Pellizotti (Ita) Bahrain-Merida 0:05:30
91 Valerio Agnoli (Ita) Bahrain-Merida 0:05:31
92 Jetse Bol (Ned) Manzana Postobon
93 Juan Felipe Osorio (Col) Manzana Postobon 0:05:32
94 Damiano Caruso (Ita) BMC Racing Team 0:05:33
95 Laurens De Vreese (Bel) Astana Pro Team 0:05:34
96 Lachlan Morton (Aus) Dimension Data 0:05:39
97 Fabricio Ferrari (Uru) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 0:05:40
98 Daniel Hoelgaard (Nor) FDJ 0:05:41
99 Richard Carapaz (Ecu) Movistar Team 0:05:45
100 Sander Armee (Bel) Lotto Soudal 0:05:47
101 Christopher Juul Jensen (Den) Orica-Scott 0:05:48
102 Antwan Tolhoek (Ned) Team LottoNL-Jumbo 0:05:49
103 Aldemar Reyes (Col) Manzana Postobon
104 Sacha Modolo (Ita) UAE Team Emirates 0:05:53
105 Antonio Pedrero (Spa) Movistar Team 0:05:54
106 Conor Dunne (Irl) Aqua Blue Sport
107 Jeremy Maison (Fra) FDJ 0:05:55
108 Tomasz Marczynski (Pol) Lotto Soudal 0:05:56
108 Hernando Bohórquez (Col) Manzana Postobon
110 Carlos Verona Quintanilla (Spa) Orica-Scott
111 Jack Haig (Aus) Orica-Scott 0:06:00
112 Federico Zurlo (Ita) UAE Team Emirates
113 Bert-Jan Lindeman (Ned) Team LottoNL-Jumbo 0:06:02
114 Johannes Fröhlinger (Ger) Team Sunweb 0:06:07
115 Pello Bilbao (Spa) Astana Pro Team 0:06:08
116 Arnaud Courteille (Fra) FDJ 0:06:09
117 Marco Haller (Aut) Katusha-Alpecin 0:06:10
118 Simon Yates (GBr) Orica-Scott 0:06:15
119 Luis Angel Maté Mardones (Spa) Cofidis, Solutions Credits
120 Christoph Pfingsten (Ger) Bora-Hansgrohe
121 William Clarke (Aus) Cannondale-Drapac 0:06:17
122 Adam Blythe (GBr) Aqua Blue Sport 0:06:18
123 Loic Vliegen (Bel) BMC Racing Team 0:06:20
124 Chris Hamilton (Aus) Team Sunweb 0:06:22
125 Peter Stetina (USA) Trek-Segafredo
126 Andreas Schillinger (Ger) Bora-Hansgrohe
127 Adam Hansen (Aus) Lotto Soudal 0:06:26
128 Tom Van Asbroeck (Bel) Cannondale-Drapac 0:06:27
129 Mark Christian (GBr) Aqua Blue Sport
130 Nikita Stalnov (Kaz) Astana Pro Team 0:06:28
131 Rafal Majka (Pol) Bora-Hansgrohe 0:06:30
132 Clement Chevrier (Fra) AG2R La Mondiale 0:06:39
133 Michael Mørkøv (Den) Katusha-Alpecin
134 Manuele Boaro (Ita) Bahrain-Merida 0:06:40
135 Juan José Lobato (Spa) Team LottoNL-Jumbo 0:06:41
136 Anthony Turgis (Fra) Cofidis, Solutions Credits 0:06:42
137 Jesus Hernandez Blazquez (Spa) Trek-Segafredo 0:06:50
138 Patrick Konrad (Aut) Bora-Hansgrohe 0:06:53
139 Jaime Roson Garcia (Spa) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 0:06:54
140 Sebastián Molano (Col) Manzana Postobon 0:06:56
141 Darwin Atapuma (Col) UAE Team Emirates 0:06:59
142 Sergei Chernetckii (Rus) Astana Pro Team 0:07:07
143 Fernando Orjuela (Col) Manzana Postobon 0:07:12
144 Davide Villella (Ita) Cannondale-Drapac 0:07:15
145 David Arroyo Duran (Spa) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 0:07:19
146 Michel Kreder (Ned) Aqua Blue Sport 0:07:31
147 Lorrenzo Manzin (Fra) FDJ 0:07:33
148 Antonio Nibali (Ita) Bahrain-Merida 0:07:36
149 Kenneth Van Bilsen (Bel) Cofidis, Solutions Credits 0:07:41
150 Michael Schwarzmann (Ger) Bora-Hansgrohe
151 Remy Mertz (Bel) Lotto Soudal 0:07:45
152 Igor Anton Hernandez (Spa) Dimension Data 0:07:53
153 Guillaume Bonnafond (Fra) Cofidis, Solutions Credits 0:07:55
154 Daniel Navarro Garcia (Spa) Cofidis, Solutions Credits 0:07:56
155 Floris De Tier (Bel) Team LottoNL-Jumbo 0:07:57
156 Sam Bewley (NZl) Orica-Scott
157 Domen Novak (Slo) Bahrain-Merida 0:08:04
158 Brendan Canty (Aus) Cannondale-Drapac 0:08:18
159 Romain Bardet (Fra) AG2R La Mondiale 0:08:23
160 Joe Dombrowski (USA) Cannondale-Drapac
161 Matvey Mamykin (Rus) Katusha-Alpecin 0:08:33
162 Hernán Aguirre (Col) Manzana Postobon 0:08:41
163 Gianni Moscon (Ita) Team Sky 0:09:03
164 Toms Skujins (Lat) Cannondale-Drapac 0:10:30
DNS Alexandre Geniez (Fra) AG2R La Mondiale
DNS Nico Denz (Ger) AG2R La Mondiale
DNS Svein Tuft (Can) Orica-Scott
DNS Kilian Frankiny (Swi) BMC Racing Team
DNS Rohan Dennis (Aus) BMC Racing Team

Points# Rider Name (Country) Team Result
1 Christopher Froome (GBr) Team Sky 25 pts
2 Wilco Kelderman (Ned) Team Sunweb 20
3 Vincenzo Nibali (Ita) Bahrain-Merida 16
4 Ilnur Zakarin (Rus) Katusha-Alpecin 14
5 Alberto Contador Velasco (Spa) Trek-Segafredo 12
6 Tobias Ludvigsson (Swe) FDJ 10
7 Wout Poels (Ned) Team Sky 9
8 Lennard Kämna (Ger) Team Sunweb 8
9 Bob Jungels (Lux) Quick-Step Floors 7
10 Daniel Oss (Ita) BMC Racing Team 6
11 Alexis Gougeard (Fra) AG2R La Mondiale 5
12 Tejay van Garderen (USA) BMC Racing Team 4
13 Yves Lampaert (Bel) Quick-Step Floors 3
14 Steven Kruijswijk (Ned) Team LottoNL-Jumbo 2
15 Matteo Trentin (Ita) Quick-Step Floors 1

Combativity# Rider Name (Country) Team Result
1 Christopher Froome (GBr) Team Sky
Teams# Rider Name (Country) Team Result
1 Team Sky 2:26:04
2 Team Sunweb 0:00:26
3 Quick-Step Floors 0:00:56
4 BMC Racing Team 0:01:52
5 Team LottoNl-Jumbo 0:02:50
6 Astana Pro Team 0:03:05
7 Aqua Blue Sport 0:03:42
8 FDJ 0:03:45
9 Trek-Segafredo 0:03:48
10 Katusha-Alpecin 0:05:14
11 Movistar Team 0:05:21
12 AG2R La Mondiale
13 Lotto Soudal 0:05:30
14 Bahrain-Merida 0:06:03
15 Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 0:06:56
16 UAE Team Emirates 0:06:58
17 Cannondale-Drapac 0:08:09
18 Cofidis, Solutions Credits 0:08:13
19 Orica-Scott 0:08:14
20 Manzana Postobon 0:10:31
21 Bora-Hansgrohe 0:11:02
22 Dimension Data 0:12:54

General classification after stage 16# Rider Name (Country) Team Result
1 Christopher Froome (GBr) Team Sky 62:53:25
2 Vincenzo Nibali (Ita) Bahrain-Merida 0:01:58
3 Wilco Kelderman (Ned) Team Sunweb 0:02:40
4 Ilnur Zakarin (Rus) Katusha-Alpecin 0:03:07
5 Alberto Contador Velasco (Spa) Trek-Segafredo 0:04:58
6 Miguel Angel Lopez (Col) Astana Pro Team 0:05:25
7 Fabio Aru (Ita) Astana Pro Team 0:06:27
8 Wout Poels (Ned) Team Sky 0:06:33
9 Johan Esteban Chaves Rubio (Col) Orica-Scott 0:06:40
10 Michael Woods (Can) Cannondale-Drapac 0:07:06
11 Tejay van Garderen (USA) BMC Racing Team 0:10:11
12 David de la Cruz (Spa) Quick-Step Floors 0:10:14
13 Steven Kruijswijk (Ned) Team LottoNL-Jumbo 0:10:17
14 Louis Meintjes (RSA) UAE Team Emirates 0:12:44
15 Mikel Nieve Ituralde (Spa) Team Sky 0:23:20
16 Sergio Pardilla Bellon (Spa) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 0:23:58
17 Nicolas Roche (Irl) BMC Racing Team 0:24:52
18 Daniel Moreno Fernandez (Spa) Movistar Team 0:31:43
19 Romain Bardet (Fra) AG2R La Mondiale 0:39:04
20 Darwin Atapuma (Col) UAE Team Emirates 0:41:46
21 Stef Clement (Ned) Team LottoNL-Jumbo 0:46:59
22 Jack Haig (Aus) Orica-Scott 0:54:25
23 Igor Anton Hernandez (Spa) Dimension Data 0:55:42
24 Sander Armee (Bel) Lotto Soudal 0:56:51
25 Pello Bilbao (Spa) Astana Pro Team 0:58:42
26 Adam Yates (GBr) Orica-Scott 1:00:04
27 Jaime Roson Garcia (Spa) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 1:00:38
28 Luis Angel Maté Mardones (Spa) Cofidis, Solutions Credits 1:02:08
29 Luis León Sánchez (Spa) Astana Pro Team 1:03:45
30 Franco Pellizotti (Ita) Bahrain-Merida 1:04:06
31 Jose Joaquin Rojas Gil (Spa) Movistar Team 1:05:30
32 Gianni Moscon (Ita) Team Sky 1:13:25
33 Jan Polanc (Slo) UAE Team Emirates 1:13:30
34 Richard Carapaz (Ecu) Movistar Team 1:18:55
35 Nelson Oliveira (Por) Movistar Team 1:18:56
36 Peter Stetina (USA) Trek-Segafredo 1:19:35
37 Jarlinson Pantano (Col) Trek-Segafredo 1:20:09
38 Simon Yates (GBr) Orica-Scott 1:21:56
39 Rui Alberto Faria da Costa (Por) UAE Team Emirates 1:24:19
40 Rafal Majka (Pol) Bora-Hansgrohe 1:24:26
41 Bob Jungels (Lux) Quick-Step Floors 1:28:35
42 Antwan Tolhoek (Ned) Team LottoNL-Jumbo 1:29:37
43 Bart De Clercq (Bel) Lotto Soudal 1:29:42
44 Matej Mohoric (Slo) UAE Team Emirates 1:30:39
45 Hernán Aguirre (Col) Manzana Postobon 1:34:43
46 Tomasz Marczynski (Pol) Lotto Soudal 1:44:19
47 Ricardo Vilela (Por) Manzana Postobon 1:45:07
48 Daan Olivier (Ned) Team LottoNL-Jumbo 1:46:56
49 Aldemar Reyes (Col) Manzana Postobon 1:47:37
50 Odd Christian Eiking (Nor) FDJ 1:50:49
51 Koen Bouwman (Ned) Team LottoNL-Jumbo 1:52:40
52 Fabricio Ferrari (Uru) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 1:53:36
53 Maxime Monfort (Bel) Lotto Soudal 1:54:02
54 Giovanni Visconti (Ita) Bahrain-Merida 1:54:44
55 Bernardo Suaza (Col) Manzana Postobon 1:55:00
56 Marc Soler (Spa) Movistar Team 1:57:56
57 Jetse Bol (Ned) Manzana Postobon 2:02:14
58 Diego Rosa (Ita) Team Sky 2:03:12
59 Jesus Hernandez Blazquez (Spa) Trek-Segafredo 2:04:08
60 Alberto Losada Alguacil (Spa) Katusha-Alpecin 2:04:55
61 Stéphane Rossetto (Fra) Cofidis, Solutions Credits 2:05:08
62 Tobias Ludvigsson (Swe) FDJ 2:05:37
63 Clement Chevrier (Fra) AG2R La Mondiale 2:06:43
64 Valerio Agnoli (Ita) Bahrain-Merida 2:07:09
65 Anthony Roux (Fra) FDJ 2:09:10
66 Thomas De Gendt (Bel) Lotto Soudal 2:10:31
67 Koen de Kort (Ned) Trek-Segafredo 2:10:55
68 Floris De Tier (Bel) Team LottoNL-Jumbo 2:12:32
69 Stefan Denifl (Aut) Aqua Blue Sport 2:13:13
70 Pawel Poljanski (Pol) Bora-Hansgrohe 2:13:58
71 Emanuel Buchmann (Ger) Bora-Hansgrohe 2:17:48
72 Anthony Perez (Fra) Cofidis, Solutions Credits 2:19:31
73 Antonio Pedrero (Spa) Movistar Team 2:23:10
74 Hector Sáez Benito (Spa) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 2:24:39
75 Lachlan Morton (Aus) Dimension Data 2:26:14
76 Salvatore Puccio (Ita) Team Sky 2:27:34
77 Simon Clarke (Aus) Cannondale-Drapac 2:28:38
78 Alessandro De Marchi (Ita) BMC Racing Team 2:29:02
79 Enric Mas (Spa) Quick-Step Floors 2:29:58
80 Jeremy Maison (Fra) FDJ 2:30:38
81 Lluís Guillermo Mas Bonet (Spa) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 2:31:19
82 Jacques Janse van Rensburg (RSA) Dimension Data 2:31:56
83 David Lopez Garcia (Spa) Team Sky 2:32:00
84 Przemyslaw Niemiec (Pol) UAE Team Emirates 2:33:18
85 Carlos Verona Quintanilla (Spa) Orica-Scott 2:33:25
86 Daniel Navarro Garcia (Spa) Cofidis, Solutions Credits 2:35:37
87 Guillaume Bonnafond (Fra) Cofidis, Solutions Credits 2:36:59
88 Juan Felipe Osorio (Col) Manzana Postobon 2:37:09
89 Sergei Chernetckii (Rus) Astana Pro Team 2:37:55
90 Julien Bernard (Fra) Trek-Segafredo 2:38:58
91 Julian Alaphilippe (Fra) Quick-Step Floors 2:39:21
92 Alexey Lutsenko (Kaz) Astana Pro Team 2:39:51
93 Adam Hansen (Aus) Lotto Soudal 2:40:04
94 Fernando Orjuela (Col) Manzana Postobon 2:41:54
95 David Arroyo Duran (Spa) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 2:43:26
96 Francisco Ventoso (Spa) BMC Racing Team 2:44:18
97 Edward Theuns (Bel) Trek-Segafredo 2:44:21
98 Lennard Kämna (Ger) Team Sunweb 2:44:49
99 Arnaud Courteille (Fra) FDJ 2:45:01
100 Davide Villella (Ita) Cannondale-Drapac 2:47:55
101 Brendan Canty (Aus) Cannondale-Drapac 2:48:11
102 Eros Capecchi (Ita) Quick-Step Floors 2:48:18
103 Matteo Trentin (Ita) Quick-Step Floors 2:49:50
104 Bert-Jan Lindeman (Ned) Team LottoNL-Jumbo 2:51:05
105 Joe Dombrowski (USA) Cannondale-Drapac 2:51:16
106 Antonio Nibali (Ita) Bahrain-Merida 2:51:37
107 Domen Novak (Slo) Bahrain-Merida 2:51:57
108 Damiano Caruso (Ita) BMC Racing Team 2:56:24
109 Manuele Boaro (Ita) Bahrain-Merida 2:56:28
110 Matvey Mamykin (Rus) Katusha-Alpecin 2:56:38
111 Julien Duval (Fra) AG2R La Mondiale 2:59:22
112 Loic Vliegen (Bel) BMC Racing Team 2:59:39
113 Hugo Houle (Can) AG2R La Mondiale 3:01:08
114 Christopher Juul Jensen (Den) Orica-Scott 3:01:43
115 Patrick Konrad (Aut) Bora-Hansgrohe 3:04:59
116 Markel Irizar Aranburu (Spa) Trek-Segafredo 3:05:12
117 Anthony Turgis (Fra) Cofidis, Solutions Credits 3:05:22
118 Marco Haller (Aut) Katusha-Alpecin 3:06:30
119 Chad Haga (USA) Team Sunweb 3:06:45
120 Johannes Fröhlinger (Ger) Team Sunweb 3:07:35
121 Juan José Lobato (Spa) Team LottoNL-Jumbo 3:08:01
122 Michel Kreder (Ned) Aqua Blue Sport 3:08:26
123 Tim Declercq (Bel) Quick-Step Floors 3:11:05
124 Alexis Gougeard (Fra) AG2R La Mondiale 3:14:06
125 Chris Hamilton (Aus) Team Sunweb 3:15:21
126 Christian Knees (Ger) Team Sky 3:17:44
127 Maxim Belkov (Rus) Katusha-Alpecin 3:18:14
128 Niki Terpstra (Ned) Quick-Step Floors 3:18:36
129 Diego Rubio (Spa) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 3:18:55
130 Rafael Reis (Por) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 3:19:36
131 Laurens De Vreese (Bel) Astana Pro Team 3:19:56
132 Søren Kragh Andersen (Den) Team Sunweb
133 Tom Van Asbroeck (Bel) Cannondale-Drapac 3:20:13
134 Sacha Modolo (Ita) UAE Team Emirates 3:20:33
135 Daniel Hoelgaard (Nor) FDJ 3:21:37
136 Hernando Bohórquez (Col) Manzana Postobon 3:22:14
137 Michael Mørkøv (Den) Katusha-Alpecin 3:22:46
138 Ivan Garcia Cortina (Spa) Bahrain-Merida 3:22:51
139 Toms Skujins (Lat) Cannondale-Drapac 3:23:17
140 Nicholas Schultz (Aus) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 3:23:48
141 Daniel Oss (Ita) BMC Racing Team 3:24:58
142 Yves Lampaert (Bel) Quick-Step Floors 3:25:03
143 Nikita Stalnov (Kaz) Astana Pro Team 3:29:01
144 Magnus Cort (Den) Orica-Scott 3:29:14
145 Christoph Pfingsten (Ger) Bora-Hansgrohe 3:31:12
146 Andreas Schillinger (Ger) Bora-Hansgrohe 3:33:01
147 Mark Christian (GBr) Aqua Blue Sport 3:33:17
148 Aaron Gate (NZl) Aqua Blue Sport 3:33:49
149 Peter Koning (Ned) Aqua Blue Sport 3:37:25
150 Ian Stannard (GBr) Team Sky 3:37:34
151 Federico Zurlo (Ita) UAE Team Emirates 3:39:58
152 Lasse Norman Hansen (Den) Aqua Blue Sport 3:40:03
153 Kenneth Van Bilsen (Bel) Cofidis, Solutions Credits 3:42:35
154 Remy Mertz (Bel) Lotto Soudal 3:44:21
155 Sebastián Molano (Col) Manzana Postobon 3:44:51
156 Rein Taaramäe (Est) Katusha-Alpecin 3:47:04
157 Thomas Scully (NZl) Cannondale-Drapac 3:47:43
158 Michael Schwarzmann (Ger) Bora-Hansgrohe 3:49:39
159 Adam Blythe (GBr) Aqua Blue Sport 3:49:40
160 Sam Bewley (NZl) Orica-Scott 3:49:47
161 William Clarke (Aus) Cannondale-Drapac 3:51:55
162 Jelle Wallays (Bel) Lotto Soudal 3:52:10
163 Lorrenzo Manzin (Fra) FDJ 3:54:18
164 Conor Dunne (Irl) Aqua Blue Sport 4:03:20

Points classification # Rider Name (Country) Team Result
1 Christopher Froome (GBr) Team Sky 135 pts
2 Matteo Trentin (Ita) Quick-Step Floors 108
3 Vincenzo Nibali (Ita) Bahrain-Merida 104
4 Wilco Kelderman (Ned) Team Sunweb 82
5 Miguel Angel Lopez (Col) Astana Pro Team 74
6 Ilnur Zakarin (Rus) Katusha-Alpecin 67
7 Johan Esteban Chaves Rubio (Col) Orica-Scott 61
8 Alberto Contador Velasco (Spa) Trek-Segafredo 60
9 Pawel Poljanski (Pol) Bora-Hansgrohe 58
10 Jose Joaquin Rojas Gil (Spa) Movistar Team 57
11 Tomasz Marczynski (Pol) Lotto Soudal 54
12 Matej Mohoric (Slo) UAE Team Emirates 47
13 Michael Woods (Can) Cannondale-Drapac 46
14 Rafal Majka (Pol) Bora-Hansgrohe 41
15 Jan Polanc (Slo) UAE Team Emirates 40
16 Tom Van Asbroeck (Bel) Cannondale-Drapac 39
17 Fabio Aru (Ita) Astana Pro Team 38
18 David de la Cruz (Spa) Quick-Step Floors 36
19 Julian Alaphilippe (Fra) Quick-Step Floors 34
20 Romain Bardet (Fra) AG2R La Mondiale 33
21 Wout Poels (Ned) Team Sky 32
22 Nicolas Roche (Irl) BMC Racing Team 30
23 Alexey Lutsenko (Kaz) Astana Pro Team 29
24 Edward Theuns (Bel) Trek-Segafredo 29
25 Yves Lampaert (Bel) Quick-Step Floors 28
26 Marc Soler (Spa) Movistar Team 28
27 Michael Schwarzmann (Ger) Bora-Hansgrohe 28
28 Alessandro De Marchi (Ita) BMC Racing Team 24
29 Søren Kragh Andersen (Den) Team Sunweb 24
30 Luis León Sánchez (Spa) Astana Pro Team 23
31 Jetse Bol (Ned) Manzana Postobon 23
32 Alexis Gougeard (Fra) AG2R La Mondiale 23
33 Sacha Modolo (Ita) UAE Team Emirates 22
34 Gianni Moscon (Ita) Team Sky 20
35 Juan José Lobato (Spa) Team LottoNL-Jumbo 20
36 Tobias Ludvigsson (Swe) FDJ 17
37 Enric Mas (Spa) Quick-Step Floors 17
38 Daniel Oss (Ita) BMC Racing Team 17
39 Tejay van Garderen (USA) BMC Racing Team 16
40 Jaime Roson Garcia (Spa) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 16
41 Anthony Perez (Fra) Cofidis, Solutions Credits 16
42 Marco Haller (Aut) Katusha-Alpecin 16
43 Michel Kreder (Ned) Aqua Blue Sport 15
44 Thomas De Gendt (Bel) Lotto Soudal 14
45 Jacques Janse van Rensburg (RSA) Dimension Data 14
46 Mikel Nieve Ituralde (Spa) Team Sky 13
47 Arnaud Courteille (Fra) FDJ 13
48 Stef Clement (Ned) Team LottoNL-Jumbo 12
49 Pello Bilbao (Spa) Astana Pro Team 12
50 Nelson Oliveira (Por) Movistar Team 12
51 Jack Haig (Aus) Orica-Scott 11
52 Brendan Canty (Aus) Cannondale-Drapac 11
53 Steven Kruijswijk (Ned) Team LottoNL-Jumbo 10
54 Darwin Atapuma (Col) UAE Team Emirates 10
55 Richard Carapaz (Ecu) Movistar Team 10
56 Floris De Tier (Bel) Team LottoNL-Jumbo 10
57 Rafael Reis (Por) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 10
58 Maxime Monfort (Bel) Lotto Soudal 9
59 Giovanni Visconti (Ita) Bahrain-Merida 9
60 Patrick Konrad (Aut) Bora-Hansgrohe 9
61 Lorrenzo Manzin (Fra) FDJ 9
62 Louis Meintjes (RSA) UAE Team Emirates 8
63 Adam Yates (GBr) Orica-Scott 8
64 Luis Angel Maté Mardones (Spa) Cofidis, Solutions Credits 8
65 Bob Jungels (Lux) Quick-Step Floors 8
66 Bart De Clercq (Bel) Lotto Soudal 8
67 Emanuel Buchmann (Ger) Bora-Hansgrohe 8
68 Lennard Kämna (Ger) Team Sunweb 8
69 Alberto Losada Alguacil (Spa) Katusha-Alpecin 7
70 Matvey Mamykin (Rus) Katusha-Alpecin 7
71 Andreas Schillinger (Ger) Bora-Hansgrohe 7
72 Adam Blythe (GBr) Aqua Blue Sport 7
73 Aldemar Reyes (Col) Manzana Postobon 6
74 Simon Clarke (Aus) Cannondale-Drapac 6
75 Jeremy Maison (Fra) FDJ 6
76 David Arroyo Duran (Spa) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 6
77 Davide Villella (Ita) Cannondale-Drapac 6
78 Daan Olivier (Ned) Team LottoNL-Jumbo 5
79 Bert-Jan Lindeman (Ned) Team LottoNL-Jumbo 5
80 Peter Koning (Ned) Aqua Blue Sport 5
81 Rui Alberto Faria da Costa (Por) UAE Team Emirates 4
82 Diego Rosa (Ita) Team Sky 4
83 Diego Rubio (Spa) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 4
84 Julien Duval (Fra) AG2R La Mondiale 4
85 Loic Vliegen (Bel) BMC Racing Team 4
86 Simon Yates (GBr) Orica-Scott 3
87 Julien Bernard (Fra) Trek-Segafredo 3
88 Sebastián Molano (Col) Manzana Postobon 3
89 Daniel Moreno Fernandez (Spa) Movistar Team 2
90 Stéphane Rossetto (Fra) Cofidis, Solutions Credits 2
91 Christian Knees (Ger) Team Sky 2
92 Jesus Hernandez Blazquez (Spa) Trek-Segafredo 1
93 Koen de Kort (Ned) Trek-Segafredo 1
94 Antonio Pedrero (Spa) Movistar Team 1
95 Christoph Pfingsten (Ger) Bora-Hansgrohe 1
96 Conor Dunne (Irl) Aqua Blue Sport 1

Mountains classification# Rider Name (Country) Team Result
1 Davide Villella (Ita) Cannondale-Drapac 49 pts
2 Miguel Angel Lopez (Col) Astana Pro Team 41
3 Christopher Froome (GBr) Team Sky 29
4 Rafal Majka (Pol) Bora-Hansgrohe 28
5 Jose Joaquin Rojas Gil (Spa) Movistar Team 27
6 Romain Bardet (Fra) AG2R La Mondiale 20
7 Thomas De Gendt (Bel) Lotto Soudal 19
8 Darwin Atapuma (Col) UAE Team Emirates 18
9 Ilnur Zakarin (Rus) Katusha-Alpecin 18
10 Johan Esteban Chaves Rubio (Col) Orica-Scott 15
11 Sander Armee (Bel) Lotto Soudal 14
12 Wilco Kelderman (Ned) Team Sunweb 14
13 Adam Yates (GBr) Orica-Scott 12
14 Tomasz Marczynski (Pol) Lotto Soudal 12
15 Lluís Guillermo Mas Bonet (Spa) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 11
16 Vincenzo Nibali (Ita) Bahrain-Merida 10
17 Stéphane Rossetto (Fra) Cofidis, Solutions Credits 9
18 Brendan Canty (Aus) Cannondale-Drapac 9
19 Jan Polanc (Slo) UAE Team Emirates 8
20 Steven Kruijswijk (Ned) Team LottoNL-Jumbo 7
21 Marc Soler (Spa) Movistar Team 6
22 Alexey Lutsenko (Kaz) Astana Pro Team 6
23 Michael Woods (Can) Cannondale-Drapac 6
24 Julian Alaphilippe (Fra) Quick-Step Floors 6
25 Matteo Trentin (Ita) Quick-Step Floors 6
26 Jacques Janse van Rensburg (RSA) Dimension Data 5
27 Przemyslaw Niemiec (Pol) UAE Team Emirates 5
28 Matej Mohoric (Slo) UAE Team Emirates 4
29 Laurens De Vreese (Bel) Astana Pro Team 4
30 Jaime Roson Garcia (Spa) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 4
31 Rui Alberto Faria da Costa (Por) UAE Team Emirates 4
32 Fabricio Ferrari (Uru) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 4
33 Nicolas Roche (Irl) BMC Racing Team 3
34 Tobias Ludvigsson (Swe) FDJ 3
35 Pawel Poljanski (Pol) Bora-Hansgrohe 3
36 Enric Mas (Spa) Quick-Step Floors 3
37 Alberto Contador Velasco (Spa) Trek-Segafredo 2
38 Luis Angel Maté Mardones (Spa) Cofidis, Solutions Credits 2
39 Jarlinson Pantano (Col) Trek-Segafredo 2
40 Simon Yates (GBr) Orica-Scott 2
41 Maxime Monfort (Bel) Lotto Soudal 2
42 Clement Chevrier (Fra) AG2R La Mondiale 2
43 Simon Clarke (Aus) Cannondale-Drapac 2
44 Bert-Jan Lindeman (Ned) Team LottoNL-Jumbo 2
45 Diego Rubio (Spa) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 2
46 Hernando Bohórquez (Col) Manzana Postobon 2
47 Daniel Oss (Ita) BMC Racing Team 2
48 Nelson Oliveira (Por) Movistar Team 1
49 Ricardo Vilela (Por) Manzana Postobon 1
50 Giovanni Visconti (Ita) Bahrain-Merida 1
51 Diego Rosa (Ita) Team Sky 1
52 Alessandro De Marchi (Ita) BMC Racing Team 1
53 Juan Felipe Osorio (Col) Manzana Postobon 1
54 Francisco Ventoso (Spa) BMC Racing Team 1
55 Arnaud Courteille (Fra) FDJ 1
56 Matvey Mamykin (Rus) Katusha-Alpecin 1
57 Rafael Reis (Por) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 1

Combined classification# Rider Name (Country) Team Result
1 Christopher Froome (GBr) Team Sky 5 pts
2 Miguel Angel Lopez (Col) Astana Pro Team 13
3 Wilco Kelderman (Ned) Team Sunweb 19
4 Ilnur Zakarin (Rus) Katusha-Alpecin 19
5 Vincenzo Nibali (Ita) Bahrain-Merida 21
6 Johan Esteban Chaves Rubio (Col) Orica-Scott 26
7 Romain Bardet (Fra) AG2R La Mondiale 45
8 Michael Woods (Can) Cannondale-Drapac 46
9 Jose Joaquin Rojas Gil (Spa) Movistar Team 46
10 Alberto Contador Velasco (Spa) Trek-Segafredo 50
11 Rafal Majka (Pol) Bora-Hansgrohe 58
12 Jan Polanc (Slo) UAE Team Emirates 67
13 Tomasz Marczynski (Pol) Lotto Soudal 71
14 Nicolas Roche (Irl) BMC Racing Team 72
15 Darwin Atapuma (Col) UAE Team Emirates 82
16 Matej Mohoric (Slo) UAE Team Emirates 84
17 Steven Kruijswijk (Ned) Team LottoNL-Jumbo 86
18 Jaime Roson Garcia (Spa) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 97
19 Adam Yates (GBr) Orica-Scott 102
20 Marc Soler (Spa) Movistar Team 103
21 Pawel Poljanski (Pol) Bora-Hansgrohe 114
22 Thomas De Gendt (Bel) Lotto Soudal 117
23 Luis Angel Maté Mardones (Spa) Cofidis, Solutions Credits 130
24 Matteo Trentin (Ita) Quick-Step Floors 130
25 Tobias Ludvigsson (Swe) FDJ 132
26 Nelson Oliveira (Por) Movistar Team 133
27 Julian Alaphilippe (Fra) Quick-Step Floors 134
28 Alexey Lutsenko (Kaz) Astana Pro Team 137
29 Rui Alberto Faria da Costa (Por) UAE Team Emirates 151
30 Maxime Monfort (Bel) Lotto Soudal 152
31 Enric Mas (Spa) Quick-Step Floors 152
32 Jacques Janse van Rensburg (RSA) Dimension Data 153
33 Alessandro De Marchi (Ita) BMC Racing Team 158
34 Giovanni Visconti (Ita) Bahrain-Merida 163
35 Simon Yates (GBr) Orica-Scott 164
36 Stéphane Rossetto (Fra) Cofidis, Solutions Credits 168
37 Brendan Canty (Aus) Cannondale-Drapac 171
38 Davide Villella (Ita) Cannondale-Drapac 178
39 Diego Rosa (Ita) Team Sky 191
40 Simon Clarke (Aus) Cannondale-Drapac 194
41 Arnaud Courteille (Fra) FDJ 201
42 Daniel Oss (Ita) BMC Racing Team 226
43 Bert-Jan Lindeman (Ned) Team LottoNL-Jumbo 227
44 Matvey Mamykin (Rus) Katusha-Alpecin 236
45 Rafael Reis (Por) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 244
46 Diego Rubio (Spa) Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 257

Teams classification# Rider Name (Country) Team Result
1 Astana Pro Team 188:20:35
2 Team Sky 0:09:33
3 Movistar Team 0:33:37
4 UAE Team Emirates 0:51:40
5 Orica-Scott 1:11:45
6 Team LottoNl-Jumbo 1:31:33
7 Caja Rural-Seguros RGA 1:42:26
8 Bahrain-Merida 1:56:10
9 BMC Racing Team 1:58:40
10 Trek-Segafredo 2:02:23
11 Quick-Step Floors 2:16:41
12 Team Sunweb 2:28:44
13 Lotto Soudal 2:52:22
14 AG2R La Mondiale 3:06:09
15 Manzana Postobon 3:16:37
16 Cofidis, Solutions Credits 3:45:47
17 Katusha-Alpecin 3:54:52
18 Cannondale-Drapac 3:57:47
19 Dimension Data 4:20:06
20 Bora-Hansgrohe 4:38:03
21 FDJ 4:39:12
22 Aqua Blue Sport 7:00:29

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Vuelta a Espana: Froome takes red with early statement of intent

Briton back in Vuelta lead for first time since 2011.

Chris Froome and Team Sky used the first mountain stage of the Vuelta a España to deliver a powerful attack that placed the Briton in the lead for the first time in six years, but which still leaves him only narrowly ahead of most of his main rivals after three stages.

Froome’s punchy move over the top of the second-category Cornella followed a devastating display of climbing strength by Sky en masse in the mountains of Andorra, starting on the first-category Rabassa climb.

Even before Froome opened up the throttle on the Cornella, teammate Gianni Moscon’s stunning acceleration, in particular, had caused Alberto Contador (Trek-Segafredo) to sink like a stone at the back of the group. Next on the front for Sky was Mikel Nieve, shrinking the group to just 15 riders, with his steady pace causing Warren Barguil (Team Sunweb) to fall off the pace.

Froome had already shown a gung-ho attitude by battling for a sprint time bonus, snatching two seconds with a second place behind teammate Diego Rosa. But it was his move around 800 metres from the summit of the Cornella that did far more damage.

Only Esteban Chaves (Orica-Scott) was able to follow, and it briefly looked as if Froome was going to open up more of a gap on the descent in a repetition of his downhill charge away in the 2016 Tour to Luchon. But instead he and the Colombian were caught by Romain Bardet (AG2R La Mondiale) and Fabio Aru (Astana) and then by a larger group of favourites including Vincenzo Nibali (Bahrain-Merida), David de La Cruz (Quick Step Floors), Nicolas Roche and Tejay Van Garderen (BMC Racing Team) and Domenico Pozzovivo (Ag2R). Finally Froome, despite a quick late dig, ended up in third place on the line.

The top 10 overall are within less than 50 seconds, meaning that rather than the knock-out blow on the first mountain stage that Froome has delivered in the Tours of 2013 and 2015, there is still margin for recovery for his rivals. However, as a confirmation of who the rider will be to beat in this year’s Tour, Sky’s collective performance, coupled with Froome’s attack and leader’s jersey is a huge statement of intent.

“It’s a great feeling to be back in the leader’s jersey after six years of fighting to be in this position, but I’m fully aware of how close the race is between me and other rivals,” Froome said.

“Chaves did a great ride today, he was the only guy who could follow me over the top of that climb. Nibali is very focussed on being ready for this year’s Vuelta, he’s still very close and there’s only two seconds between myself and the next group of favourites. I’m going to have to fight for every second I can at every opportunity.”

Froome said that his intention today was “to push on a little bit, to see exactly who’s here to fight for GC and who’s not. The team was just fantastic, too, Gianni Moscon did a brilliant job, this is his first Grand Tour and he destroyed the field. I had to ask him to slow down at one point because he was dropping me off his wheel and I have to thank them for doing such a good job.”

Asked if he thought he was in as good shape as after the Tour, Froome said, “It’s very difficult to tell. It’s still very early in the race, today [Monday] was quite a short, punchy climb and the next week or so will show a lot more. For now I’m feeling good, I’m going to do everything to try and hold onto the jersey.

“I know it’s going to be close that’s why I have kept on going for those bonus seconds. But I certainly think doing the Tour-Vuelta double is possible. If I didn’t, I wouldn’t be here.”

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The white whale: Froome’s seven-year quest to win the Vuelta a Espana

Charting the Briton’s fortunes at the Spanish Grand Tour since that career-defining 2011 debut

Chris Froome may be a four-time winner of the Tour de France, but the Vuelta a España remains something of a white whale for the Sky rider, who has placed second overall three times in five appearances but never succeeded in carrying the red jersey to Madrid.

2017 marks the third time that Froome has attempted to win the Tour-Vuelta double, a feat only ever achieved by Jacques Anquetil and Bernard Hinault, and never since the Vuelta moved to its current, post-Tour slot on the calendar in 1995.

Froome responded to his – relative – struggles in the second week of this year’s Tour by pointing out that his 2017 preparation had been tailored to allow him to maintain his form into the August and September as part of his Vuelta bid. The team around him is perhaps the strongest supporting cast in the race, with Wout Poels, who missed the Tour, back at Froome’s side. Sky will even travel around Spain accompanied by what it calls a ‘Race hub’, namely a truck that expands into work spaces for the team’s staff. As ever, no expense has been spared by the British squad but, as Froome has discovered over the years, plans have a habit of going awry in late summer in Spain.
2011: 2nd overall, 13 seconds behind Juan José Cobo

Six years on, Juan José Cobo’s overall victory at the 2011 Vuelta a España is now viewed as something of an aberration – the ‘Bison’ was last seen in the colours of Turkish Continental outfit Torku Sekerspor in 2014 – but he had a considerably finer pedigree than the man who reached Madrid in second place overall. Cobo had won a stage and placed 10th at the Vuelta in 2009, after all. He had won the Tour of the Basque Country and been retroactively awarded a stage of the 2008 Tour de France. Chris Froome, by contrast, had seemed to come from nowhere.

That August, Froome’s two-year stint at Team Sky looked to be petering towards a forgettable conclusion. 45th overall at the Brixia Tour and 85th at the Tour de Pologne, he had done little to warrant inclusion in the squad for the forthcoming Vuelta, but when Lars Petter Nordhaug withdrew from consideration, Froome found himself on the start line in Benidorm. And so began the most sudden and startling transformation in modern cycling.

Froome caught everyone – his Sky team seemingly included – by surprise when he seized the overall lead after delivering what was, to that point, the time trial of his life in Salamanca on stage 10. His team leader Bradley Wiggins had been expected to move into the red jersey that afternoon, but instead it was a faintly confused Froome who clambered onto the podium after being the only rider to finish within a minute of Tony Martin. “I wasn’t really expecting that,” Froome said. “I just had a fantastic day and somehow I’ve ended up in the leader’s jersey.”

In later years, Sky manager Dave Brailsford would describe Froome as a “diamond in the rough”, but he scarcely seemed a precious commodity when he was delegated to ride for Wiggins on the next stage to Alto de la Manzaneda, where he surrendered the lead to his captain. When Cobo launched what proved the race-winning attack on the Angliru on stage 15, meanwhile, Froome was again pressed into Wiggins’ service, and only seemed to realise in the final two kilometres that he was, in fact, the stronger of the pair.

That hesitation – not to mention Sky’s gearing selection on the Angliru – would prove costly. In the final week, the Vuelta became a duel between Froome and Cobo. Froome claimed stage honours at Peña Cabarga, but he could not dislodge Cobo, and he reached Madrid a mere 13 seconds down.

According to David Walsh, the spike in Froome’s performance on that Vuelta was surprising enough for Sky’s medical staff to re-examine all of his blood samples from the previous two seasons. A week after the race finished, Sky announced that Froome had signed a new, three-year contract.

2012: 4th overall, 10:16 behind Alberto Contador

What a difference a year makes. Twelve months after inching towards the exit at Sky, Froome returned to the Vuelta as team leader at the end of a season that had yielded second place at the Tour de France and a bronze medal in the Olympic Games time trial. Froome had spent the Tour riding shotgun for Wiggins but, like at the 2011 Vuelta, the race had only underscored that he was a far more reliable option in the high mountains than his nominal captain.

Sky paid heed to the lessons of the Tour. They were already pencilling Froome in as team leader for the 2013 Tour and pushing Wiggins towards an ill-fated tilt at the Giro. The 2012 Vuelta, then, was an additional examination of Froome’s credentials before the line of succession was confirmed. In hindsight, with the exertions of the Tour and the Olympics in his legs, the race seemed a test of the limits of Froome’s endurance as much as a realistic attempt at overall victory.

Even so, Froome began the race well, performing strongly on uphill finishes at Eibar, Jaca and Collada de la Gallina. After the Pontevedra time trial on stage 11, he lay third overall, just 16 seconds behind Joaquim Rodriguez, but he faded thereafter, conceding clumps of time on successive days at Ancares, Lagos de Covadonga and Cuitu Negru.

By the time Alberto Contador turned the Vuelta on its head on the road to Fuente Dé on stage 17, Froome found himself almost 10 minutes down, and out of the hunt even for a podium place. The final week proved a slog, and Froome was distanced once again at Bola del Mundo, but he emerged from the ordeal in 4th place overall, 10:16 down on Contador, who had returned from a doping ban in late summer. In that light, the 2012 Vuelta was a most useful gauge, too, of the threat Contador might pose to Froome and Sky at the following year’s Tour.
2014: 2nd overall, 1:10

After winning the 2013 Tour, Froome eschewed the Vuelta in favour of winding down his season gently at the USA Pro Challenge and the WorldTour races in Montreal. The defence of Froome’s Tour title lasted a mere four and a half stages, however, when he broke his scaphoid in a crash on the road to Arenberg, and it meant that his 2014 calendar was hastily redrawn to include the Vuelta.

Froome was not, of course, the only high-profile rider seeking redemption at the Vuelta. Alberto Contador had also crashed out of the Tour, fracturing his tibia on the descent of the Petit Ballon. It was perhaps only fitting that Froome and Contador were united in their misfortune, given how they had avoided one another for much of the early-season ahead of their anticipated clash at the Tour.

The duel was instead postponed until the Vuelta, and was nip and tuck through the punchy opening week in Andalusia, where they placed second and third on the hilltop finish at La Zubia. Contador began to impose himself as the race moved northwards, however, gaining 25 seconds on Froome with a stinging late attack at Valdelinares and then moving into the red jersey as the Briton surprisingly struggled in the Borja time trial.

At that point, Froome lay 5th overall, but it was nonetheless apparent that he was the only man capable of denying Contador victory. He duly launched a volley of attacks on the summit finish at La Farrapona on stage 16, but Contador resisted them and then tacked on an acceleration of his own to win the stage. Although Froome finally clawed back a handful of seconds at Mont Castove, it was clear that Contador, at least on this Vuelta, more than had his measure. As if to prove the point, Contador proceeded to drop Froome to win the penultimate stage on the Puerto de Ancares to seal overall victory, 1:10 clear of the Sky man.

“I gave it everything in the final, I tried to drop him but he was better than me,” Froome said. “I think this is going to give me a lot of motivation going forward. I came here with quite modest expectations, so to be sitting second here I’m really very happy with it.”
2015: DNS, stage 12

If the Froome-Contador encounter at the 2014 Vuelta had been a metaphorical opening gambit for the following year’s Tour, then Froome took the idea rather more literally after reclaiming the maillot jaune in July 2015. Riding the Vuelta in 2011, 2012 and 2014, he reasoned, had shortened the winter, and provided something of a foundation for successful Tours the following summer. Unlike after his previous Tour win in 2013, Froome decided to prolong the hardship by lining out for the Vuelta.

For much of the opening week, Froome looked a shadow of the figure who had decided the Tour in one chillingly dominant display at La Pierre Saint Martin. On that afternoon in the Pyrenees, Froome pedalled with the same kind of facility he had shown at Mont Ventoux in 2013, but he was rather heavier-legged in the opening climbs at the Vuelta, conceding ground to Esteban Chaves, Dan Martin and even his Sky teammate Nicolas Roche.

Only at Cumbre del Sol on stage 9, where he placed second behind a surprising Tom Dumoulin, did Froome show any of the vim of July. He reached the first rest day in 8th place overall, 1:18 behind the Dutchman and hopeful that the Pyrenees would prove more to his liking than the shorter, explosive ascents of the race’s opening half.

nstead, the Vuelta’s toughest stage, the miniature epic from Andorra to Cortals d’Encamp, would prove Froome’s final act, as he crashed ahead of the first climb, the Collada de Beixalis. Although he remounted and even briefly re-joined the red jersey group, he was riding on borrowed time. “From then on, I just tried to hang on for dear life. I convinced myself just to get to the finish,” Froome said after crossing the line more than 9 minutes down on Mikel Landa. A post-stage scan revealed that he had fractured a navicular bone in his foot, and he withdrew from the race.
2016: 2nd overall, 1:23 behind Nairo Quintana

Froome and Sky’s strength at the 2016 Tour was such that the race slowly developed into something a procession, and by the time he reached Paris, he was rather more forthright than usual about his intention to attempt the Tour-Vuelta double. Perhaps for the first time, it seemed that the demands of the Spanish race had been factored into his approach to the Tour rather than tacked on as a mere afterthought.

That said, navigating the four-week gap between the Tour and Vuelta was made rather more complicated by Olympic Games in Rio, which took place on a parcours seemingly well-suited to Froome’s characteristics. Although he struggled in the road race, Froome recovered sufficiently to take a second successive bronze medal in the time trial, and came back across the Atlantic as favourite to win the Vuelta.

Froome looked rather more comfortable than he had done in 2015 on the punchy finales of the Vuelta’s opening week, but then conceded ground to Nairo Quintana once the race reached more mountainous terrain on the second weekend. When Quintana soloed clear at Lagos de Covadonga and gained more than a minute, it initially seemed as though he had delivered a knockout blow, but Froome delivered a stirring fightback in the closing kilometres to pin that deficit back to just 25 seconds by the summit.

Froome proceeded to beat Quintana to the summit of Peña Cabarga after they slugged it out on the next stage, and through the second week, he broke even with the Colombian, remaining second overall, just shy of a minute down. With a 37-kilometre time trial still to come, the balance seemed to be tilting in Froome’s favour only for Sky to endure a calamitous outing on the short, explosive stage to Formigal.

The catalyst was a familiar one. Contador, already more than three minutes back and seemingly out of contention, proceeded to rage against the dying of the light by attacking from the gun. Quintana was alive to the danger of an ambush but Froome and Sky were ruinously ill prepared. As the bunch strung out in the face of the early accelerations, they never managed to close the gap. An isolated Froome struggled in the finale, and conceded 2:27 to Quintana by day’s end.

All of his Sky teammates, meanwhile, were among the 93 riders – later reinstated – who finished outside the time limit on a chaotic afternoon of racing. “Personally, I believe the rule probably should have been upheld,” Froome said, perhaps pointedly. He was a comfortable winner of the Calpe time trial with two days remaining, but it was a mere consolation prize. Quintana rode into Madrid in red, 1:23 ahead of Froome. “It’s definitely possible to win the Tour and the Vuelta,” Froome insisted after descending from the podium. It went almost without saying that he would try again in 2017.